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N-body models of extended star clusters

Hurley, Jarrod; Mackey, Alasdair

Description

We use direct N-body simulations to investigate the evolution of star clusters with large size-scales with the particular goal of understanding the so-called extended clusters observed in various Local Group galaxies, including M31 and NGC 6822. The N-body models incorporate a stellar mass function, stellar evolution and the tidal field of a host galaxy. We find that extended clusters can arise naturally within a weak tidal field, provided that the tidal radius is filled at the start of the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHurley, Jarrod
dc.contributor.authorMackey, Alasdair
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:11:57Z
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/63906
dc.description.abstractWe use direct N-body simulations to investigate the evolution of star clusters with large size-scales with the particular goal of understanding the so-called extended clusters observed in various Local Group galaxies, including M31 and NGC 6822. The N-body models incorporate a stellar mass function, stellar evolution and the tidal field of a host galaxy. We find that extended clusters can arise naturally within a weak tidal field, provided that the tidal radius is filled at the start of the evolution. Differences in the initial tidal filling factor can produce marked differences in the subsequent evolution of clusters and the size-scales that would be observed. These differences are more marked than any produced by internal evolution processes linked to the properties of cluster binary stars or the action of an intermediate-mass black hole, based on models performed in this work and previous work to date. Models evolved in a stronger tidal field show that extended clusters cannot form and evolve within the inner regions of a galaxy, such as M31. Instead, our results support the suggestion that many extended clusters found in large galaxies were accreted as members of dwarf galaxies that were subsequently disrupted. Our results also enhance the recent suggestion that star clusters evolve to a common sequence in terms of their size and mass.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
dc.subjectKeywords: Galaxies: evolution; Galaxies: star clusters: general; Globular clusters: general; Methods: numerical; Stars: evolution
dc.titleN-body models of extended star clusters
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume408
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor020103 - Cosmology and Extragalactic Astronomy
local.identifier.ariespublicationf2965xPUB862
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHurley, Jarrod, Swinburne University of Technology
local.contributor.affiliationMackey, Alasdair, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage2353
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage2363
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.17285.x
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:33:29Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-78049459433
local.identifier.thomsonID000283712700027
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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