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Last millennium climate change in the occupation and abandonment of Palau's Rock Islands

Clark, Geoffrey; Reepmeyer, Christian

Description

The role of AD 1300 climate change in widespread societal change in Palau and the Pacific Basin has recently been debated by Fitzpatrick (2010, 2011) and Nunn and Hunter-Anderson (2011). The central proposition examined here is the link between a sealevel driven food crisis and the outbreak of conflict, which is hypothesized in the AD 1300 event model to have led people to shift from unprotected coastal parts of large islands (e.g. volcanic Babeldaob) to more readily defensible offshore islands...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorClark, Geoffrey
dc.contributor.authorReepmeyer, Christian
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:11:56Z
dc.identifier.issn0003-8121
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/63899
dc.description.abstractThe role of AD 1300 climate change in widespread societal change in Palau and the Pacific Basin has recently been debated by Fitzpatrick (2010, 2011) and Nunn and Hunter-Anderson (2011). The central proposition examined here is the link between a sealevel driven food crisis and the outbreak of conflict, which is hypothesized in the AD 1300 event model to have led people to shift from unprotected coastal parts of large islands (e.g. volcanic Babeldaob) to more readily defensible offshore islands (e.g. limestone 'Rock Islands') during the transition between the Medieval Warm Period (MWP) and the Little Ice Age (LIA). Revision of radiocarbon dates from village sites in the Rock Islands suggests instead that permanent settlements were established on small offshore islands during the MWP with village abandonment during the LIA. Palaeoclimate records from equatorial islands show that during the LIA Palau had less rainfall from the southward movement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The abandonment of multiple limestone islands by a population estimated at 4000-6000 people may have been influenced by decreased precipitation and more tentatively from a decline in near-shore marine foods as a result of sea-level fall.
dc.publisherSydney University Press
dc.sourceArchaeology in Oceania
dc.subjectKeywords: AD 1300 event; Climate change; Pacific Basin; Radiocarbon
dc.titleLast millennium climate change in the occupation and abandonment of Palau's Rock Islands
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume47
dc.date.issued2012
local.identifier.absfor210100 - ARCHAEOLOGY
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB861
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationClark, Geoffrey, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationReepmeyer, Christian, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage29
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage38
local.identifier.doi10.1002/j.1834-4453.2012.tb00112.x
dc.date.updated2020-11-15T07:19:41Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84858806084
local.identifier.thomsonID000302985700003
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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