Skip navigation
Skip navigation
Open Research will be down for maintenance between 8:00 and 8:15 am on Tuesday, December 1 2020.

Distribution and population genetic structure of the critically endangered skink Nangura spinosa, and the implications for management

Borsboom, Adrian C.; Couper, Patrick J.; Amey, Andrew; Hoskin, Conrad

Description

Many threatened species occur as small, isolated populations. Understanding the extent and genetic distinctiveness of these populations is essential for management. Nangura spinosa is a critically endangered skink known from two small populations in dry rainforest in south-east Queensland. We conducted targeted surveys between 2001 and 2010 at the two known N. spinosa sites (Nangur National Park, Oakview National Park area) and in 22 nearby forest blocks with potentially suitable habitat. N....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBorsboom, Adrian C.
dc.contributor.authorCouper, Patrick J.
dc.contributor.authorAmey, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorHoskin, Conrad
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:06:56Z
dc.identifier.issn0004-959X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/62873
dc.description.abstractMany threatened species occur as small, isolated populations. Understanding the extent and genetic distinctiveness of these populations is essential for management. Nangura spinosa is a critically endangered skink known from two small populations in dry rainforest in south-east Queensland. We conducted targeted surveys between 2001 and 2010 at the two known N. spinosa sites (Nangur National Park, Oakview National Park area) and in 22 nearby forest blocks with potentially suitable habitat. N. spinosa was found only at the two previously known sites, which are ∼36km apart. The skink appears to be declining at Nangur NP, to an estimated extent of occurrence of 7.4ha and potentially no more than 35 adults. In contrast, we increase the extent of occurrence at Oakview to 360ha, where the population is at least in the hundreds. Sequencing of two mtDNA genes revealed considerable genetic divergence between the two populations (3.8% for ND4; 1.2% for 16S), suggesting an extended period of separation. Population fragmentation is therefore not the result of recent land clearing, but of long-term isolation by unsuitable habitat. Each population should be considered a distinct management unit. More data are required on population size and trends, recruitment and threats, particularly for the Nangur population.
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.sourceAustralian Journal of Zoology
dc.subjectKeywords: adult; divergence; endangered species; fragmentation; genetic analysis; genetic structure; habitat type; management practice; phylogeography; population decline; population distribution; population size; population structure; rainforest; recruitment (popu dry rainforest; phylogeography; surveys; threatened species
dc.titleDistribution and population genetic structure of the critically endangered skink Nangura spinosa, and the implications for management
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume58
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor060302 - Biogeography and Phylogeography
local.identifier.absfor060411 - Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
local.identifier.absfor050202 - Conservation and Biodiversity
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB745
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBorsboom, Adrian C., Queensland Herbarium, Brisbane Botanic Gardens
local.contributor.affiliationCouper, Patrick J., Queensland Museum
local.contributor.affiliationAmey, Andrew, Queensland Museum
local.contributor.affiliationHoskin, Conrad, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage369
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage375
local.identifier.doi10.1071/ZO10070
local.identifier.absseo960805 - Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity at Regional or Larger Scales
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T12:08:10Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-79955096904
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Borsboom_Distribution_and_population_2010.pdf791.25 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator