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Evolutionary speed limited by water in arid Australia

Goldie, Xavier; Gillman, Len; Crisp, Michael; Wright, Shane

Description

The covariation of biodiversity with climate is a fundamental pattern in nature. However, despite the ubiquity of this relationship, a consensus on the ultimate cause remains elusive. The evolutionary speed hypothesis posits direct mechanistic links between ambient temperature, the tempo of micro-evolution and, ultimately, species richness. Previous research has demonstrated faster rates of molecular evolution in warmer climates for a broad range of poikilothermic and homeothermic organisms, in...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGoldie, Xavier
dc.contributor.authorGillman, Len
dc.contributor.authorCrisp, Michael
dc.contributor.authorWright, Shane
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:06:44Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/62783
dc.description.abstractThe covariation of biodiversity with climate is a fundamental pattern in nature. However, despite the ubiquity of this relationship, a consensus on the ultimate cause remains elusive. The evolutionary speed hypothesis posits direct mechanistic links between ambient temperature, the tempo of micro-evolution and, ultimately, species richness. Previous research has demonstrated faster rates of molecular evolution in warmer climates for a broad range of poikilothermic and homeothermic organisms, in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. In terrestrial systems, species richness increases with both temperature and water availability and the interaction of those terms: productivity. However, the influence of water availability as an independent variable on micro-evolutionary processes has not been examined previously. Here, using methodology that limits the potentially confounding role of cladogenetic and demographic processes, we report, to our knowledge, the first evidence that woody plants living in the arid Australian Outback are evolving more slowly than related species growing at similar latitudes in moist habitats on the mesic continental margins. These results support a modified evolutionary speed explanation for the relationship between the water-energy balance and plant diversity patterns.
dc.publisherRoyal Society of London
dc.sourceProceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences
dc.subjectKeywords: water; aquatic environment; biodiversity; cladistics; continental margin; covariance analysis; energy balance; evolutionary biology; generation time; plant; species diversity; species richness; terrestrial environment; water availability; Australia; biodi Generation time; Molecular evolution; Productivity; Species richness; Water-energy dynamics
dc.titleEvolutionary speed limited by water in arid Australia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume2010
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor060309 - Phylogeny and Comparative Analysis
local.identifier.absfor060302 - Biogeography and Phylogeography
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB736
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationGoldie, Xavier, University of Auckland
local.contributor.affiliationGillman, Len, Auckland University of Technology
local.contributor.affiliationCrisp, Michael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWright, Shane, University of Auckland
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issueonline 21 April 2010
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage10
local.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2010.0439
local.identifier.absseo960811 - Sparseland, Permanent Grassland and Arid Zone Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T12:08:06Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77956920369
local.identifier.thomsonID000280320900008
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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