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Securitization of infectious diseases in Vietnam: The cases of HIV and avian influenza

Herington, Jonathan

Description

The frequent and swift emergence of new and devastating infectious diseases has brought renewed attention to health as an issue of international importance. Some states and regional organizations, including in Asia, have begun to regard infectious disease as a national and international security issue. This article seeks to examine the Vietnamese government's response to the epidemics of avian influenza and Human immunodeficiency virus. Both diseases have been recognized at different times as...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHerington, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:06:30Z
dc.identifier.issn1460-2237
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/62691
dc.description.abstractThe frequent and swift emergence of new and devastating infectious diseases has brought renewed attention to health as an issue of international importance. Some states and regional organizations, including in Asia, have begun to regard infectious disease as a national and international security issue. This article seeks to examine the Vietnamese government's response to the epidemics of avian influenza and Human immunodeficiency virus. Both diseases have been recognized at different times as threats to international security and both are serious infectious disease problems in Vietnam. Yet, the character of the central government's response to these two epidemics has been starkly different. How and why this disparity in policy approaches occurs depends largely on the epidemiological, economic and political context in which they occur. Although epidemiological factors are frequently explored when discussing disease as a security issue, seldom are the political, social and economic characteristics of the state invoked. These dimensions, and their interaction with the epidemiology of the disease, are central to understanding which diseases are ultimately treated by states as security issues. In particular, the role of economic security as a powerful motivator for resistance to control measures and the role that local implementation of policies can have in disrupting the effect of central government policy are explored. In exploring both the outcomes of securitization, and its facilitating conditions, I suggest some preliminary observations on the potential costs and benefits of securitizing infectious disease and its utility as a mechanism for protecting health in Asia.
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.sourceHealth Policy and Planning: a journal on health in development
dc.subjectKeywords: animal; article; avian influenza; bird; economics; human; Human immunodeficiency virus infection; influenza; Influenza virus A H5N1; organization and management; Viet Nam; Animals; Birds; HIV Infections; Humans; Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype; Influenza H5N1; health governance; health security; HIV; Vietnam
dc.titleSecuritization of infectious diseases in Vietnam: The cases of HIV and avian influenza
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume25
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor220101 - Bioethics (human and animal)
local.identifier.ariespublicationf2965xPUB726
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHerington, Jonathan, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage467
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage475
local.identifier.doi10.1093/heapol/czq052
local.identifier.absseo970122 - Expanding Knowledge in Philosophy and Religious Studies
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:32:10Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77958526388
local.identifier.thomsonID000283676700003
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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