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Improving biodiversity monitoring

Gibbons, Philip; Bourke, Max; Burgmann, M A; Dickman, Chris R; Ferrier, Simon; Fitzsimons, James; Freudenberger, David; Garnett, Stephen T; Groves, Craig; Hobbs, Richard; Kingsford, R. T; Krebs, C. J; Legge, Sarah; Lowe, Andrew J; McLean, Bob; Montambault, Jensen; Possingham, Hugh P; Radford, Jim; Robinson, Doug; Smallbone, Lisa; Thomas, David; Varcoe, Tony; Vardon, Michael; Wardle, G. M; Woinarski, J. C. Z; Zerger, Andre; Lindenmayer, David B

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Effective biodiversity monitoring is critical to evaluate, learn from, and ultimately improve conservation practice. Well conceived, designed and implemented monitoring of biodiversity should: (i) deliver information on trends in key aspects of biodiversity (e.g. population changes); (ii) provide early warning of problems that might otherwise be difficult or expensive to reverse; (iii) generate quantifiable evidence of conservation successes (e.g. species recovery following management) and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGibbons, Philip
dc.contributor.authorBourke, Max
dc.contributor.authorBurgmann, M A
dc.contributor.authorDickman, Chris R
dc.contributor.authorFerrier, Simon
dc.contributor.authorFitzsimons, James
dc.contributor.authorFreudenberger, David
dc.contributor.authorGarnett, Stephen T
dc.contributor.authorGroves, Craig
dc.contributor.authorHobbs, Richard
dc.contributor.authorKingsford, R. T
dc.contributor.authorKrebs, C. J
dc.contributor.authorLegge, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorLowe, Andrew J
dc.contributor.authorMcLean, Bob
dc.contributor.authorMontambault, Jensen
dc.contributor.authorPossingham, Hugh P
dc.contributor.authorRadford, Jim
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Doug
dc.contributor.authorSmallbone, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorThomas, David
dc.contributor.authorVarcoe, Tony
dc.contributor.authorVardon, Michael
dc.contributor.authorWardle, G. M
dc.contributor.authorWoinarski, J. C. Z
dc.contributor.authorZerger, Andre
dc.contributor.authorLindenmayer, David B
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:06:09Z
dc.identifier.issn1442-9985
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/62636
dc.description.abstractEffective biodiversity monitoring is critical to evaluate, learn from, and ultimately improve conservation practice. Well conceived, designed and implemented monitoring of biodiversity should: (i) deliver information on trends in key aspects of biodiversity (e.g. population changes); (ii) provide early warning of problems that might otherwise be difficult or expensive to reverse; (iii) generate quantifiable evidence of conservation successes (e.g. species recovery following management) and conservation failures; (iv) highlight ways to make management more effective; and (v) provide information on return on conservation investment. The importance of effective biodiversity monitoring is widely recognized (e.g. Australian Biodiversity Strategy). Yet, while everyone thinks biodiversity monitoring is a good idea, this has not translated into a culture of sound biodiversity monitoring, or widespread use of monitoring data. We identify four barriers to more effective biodiversity monitoring in Australia. These are: (i) many conservation programmes have poorly articulated or vague objectives against which it is difficult to measure progress contributing to design and implementation problems; (ii) the case for long-term and sustained biodiversity monitoring is often poorly developed and/or articulated; (iii) there is often a lack of appropriate institutional support, co-ordination, and targeted funding for biodiversity monitoring; and (iv) there is often a lack of appropriate standards to guide monitoring activities and make data available from these programmes. To deal with these issues, we suggest that policy makers, resource managers and scientists better and more explicitly articulate the objectives of biodiversity monitoring and better demonstrate the case for greater investments in biodiversitymonitoring. There is an urgent need for improved institutional support for biodiversity monitoring in Australia, for improved monitoring standards, and for improved archiving of, and access to, monitoring data. We suggest that more strategic financial, institutional and intellectual investments in monitoring will lead to more efficient use of the resources available for biodiversity conservation and ultimately better conservation outcomes.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Science Asia
dc.sourceAustral Ecology
dc.subjectKeywords: biodiversity; conservation management; environmental monitoring; implementation process; resource availability; resource management; Australia Biodiversity; Conservation effectiveness; Management intervention; Monitoring; National Biodiversity Strategy
dc.titleImproving biodiversity monitoring
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolumeOnline 31 OCT 2011
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor050206 - Environmental Monitoring
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4279067xPUB719
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationLindenmayer, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGibbons, Philip, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBourke, Max, The Thomas Foundation
local.contributor.affiliationBurgmann, M A, University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationDickman, Chris R., University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationFerrier, Simon, CSIRO Entomology
local.contributor.affiliationFitzsimons, James, Deakin University
local.contributor.affiliationFreudenberger, David, Greening Australia
local.contributor.affiliationGarnett, Stephen T, Charles Darwin University
local.contributor.affiliationGroves, Craig, The Nature Conservancy
local.contributor.affiliationHobbs, Richard, University of Western Australia
local.contributor.affiliationKingsford, R T, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationKrebs, C.J., University of British Columbia
local.contributor.affiliationLegge, Sarah, Australian Wildlife Conservancy
local.contributor.affiliationLowe, Andrew J., University of Adelaide
local.contributor.affiliationMcLean, Bob, The Thomas Foundation
local.contributor.affiliationMontambault, Jensen, The Nature Conservancy
local.contributor.affiliationPossingham, Hugh P, University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationRadford, Jim, Bush Heritage Australia
local.contributor.affiliationRobinson, Doug, Trust for Australia
local.contributor.affiliationSmallbone, Lisa, Charles Sturt University
local.contributor.affiliationThomas, David, The Thomas Foundation
local.contributor.affiliationVarcoe, Tony, Parks Victoria
local.contributor.affiliationVardon, Michael, Australian Bureau of Statistics
local.contributor.affiliationWardle, G. M., University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationWoinarski, J.C.Z., NT Department of Natural Resources, Environment and the Arts, Palmerston
local.contributor.affiliationZerger, Andre, CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1442-9993.2011.02314.x
local.identifier.absseo960599 - Ecosystem Assessment and Management not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:52:41Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84860229264
local.identifier.thomsonID000303118800005
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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