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C4 rice: a challenge for plant phenomics

Furbank, Robert Thomas; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Sheehy, John; Edwards, Gerald

Description

There is now strong evidence that yield potential in rice (Oryza sativa L.) is becoming limited by 'source' capacity, i.e. photosynthetic capacity or efficiency, and hence the ability to fill the large number of grain 'sinks' produced in modern varieties. One solution to this problem is to introduce a more efficient, higher capacity photosynthetic mechanism to rice, the C 4 pathway. A major challenge is identifying and engineering the genes necessary to install C4 photosynthesis in rice....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFurbank, Robert Thomas
dc.contributor.authorvon Caemmerer, Susanne
dc.contributor.authorSheehy, John
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Gerald
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:05:56Z
dc.identifier.issn1445-4408
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/62572
dc.description.abstractThere is now strong evidence that yield potential in rice (Oryza sativa L.) is becoming limited by 'source' capacity, i.e. photosynthetic capacity or efficiency, and hence the ability to fill the large number of grain 'sinks' produced in modern varieties. One solution to this problem is to introduce a more efficient, higher capacity photosynthetic mechanism to rice, the C 4 pathway. A major challenge is identifying and engineering the genes necessary to install C4 photosynthesis in rice. Recently, an international research consortium was established to achieve this aim. Central to the aims of this project is phenotyping large populations of rice and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) mutants for 'C4-ness' to identify C3 plants that have acquired C4 characteristics or revertant C 4 plants that have lost them. This paper describes a variety of plant phenomics approaches to identify these plants and the genes responsible, based on our detailed physiological knowledge of C4 photosynthesis. Strategies to asses the physiological effects of the installation of components of the C4 pathway in rice are also presented.
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.sourceFunctional Plant Biology
dc.subjectKeywords: Carbon isotope discrimination; Chlorophyll fluorescence; CO 2 compensation point; Compensation points; Photosynthetic efficiency; Chlorophyll; Fluorescence; Genes; Isotopes; Porphyrins; Photosynthesis; C4 plant; carbon isotope; crop improvement; Carbon isotope discrimination; Chlorophyll fluorescence; CO2 compensation point; Kranz anatomy; Photosynthesis; Photosynthetic efficiency
dc.titleC4 rice: a challenge for plant phenomics
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume36
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor060705 - Plant Physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9204316xPUB712
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFurbank, Robert Thomas, CSIRO Division of Plant Industry
local.contributor.affiliationvon Caemmerer, Susanne, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSheehy, John, International Rice Research Institute
local.contributor.affiliationEdwards, Gerald, Washington State University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue11
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage845
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage856
local.identifier.doi10.1071/FP09185
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T11:53:28Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-70449629797
local.identifier.thomsonID000271464600002
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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