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Recent declines in breast cancer incidence: mounting evidence that reduced use of menopausal hormones is largely responsible

Banks, Emily; Canfell, Karen

Description

Substantial reductions in breast cancer incidence in women 50 years old or older have been observed recently in many developed countries, and falling use of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) remains the most plausible explanation. In keeping with recent observations from the Women's Health Initiative, a report from the California Teachers Study cohort in this issue of Breast Cancer Research adds to this growing evidence. The investigators found a 26% reduction in invasive breast cancer in the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBanks, Emily
dc.contributor.authorCanfell, Karen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:04:33Z
dc.identifier.issn1465-542X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/62417
dc.description.abstractSubstantial reductions in breast cancer incidence in women 50 years old or older have been observed recently in many developed countries, and falling use of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) remains the most plausible explanation. In keeping with recent observations from the Women's Health Initiative, a report from the California Teachers Study cohort in this issue of Breast Cancer Research adds to this growing evidence. The investigators found a 26% reduction in invasive breast cancer in the cohort from 2000-2002 to 2003-2005, which accompanied an estimated 64% drop in HT use between 2000-2001 and 2005-2006. By collating individual data on the use of HT and breast cancer incidence, they also demonstrated that the decline in incidence was concentrated in women who had ceased HT use. The decline refl ected a decrease predominantly in oestrogen receptor-positive tumours in the context of stable screening patterns over the study period. Millions of women continue to use HT, and these fi ndings support carefully targeted shortduration use as an important ongoing strategy to minimise breast cancer risk.
dc.publisherCurrent Science Inc
dc.sourceBreast Cancer Research (Online edition)
dc.subjectKeywords: estrogen receptor; breast cancer; cancer incidence; cancer risk; editorial; hormone substitution; human; mammography; menopause; women's health
dc.titleRecent declines in breast cancer incidence: mounting evidence that reduced use of menopausal hormones is largely responsible
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume12
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationf2965xPUB697
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBanks, Emily, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCanfell, Karen, Cancer Counsil NSW
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue103
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage3
local.identifier.doi10.1186/bcr2463
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:31:55Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77956027867
local.identifier.thomsonID000276986300003
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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