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Inbreeding and advertisement calling in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus : laboratory and field experiments

Drayton, Jean; Milner, Richard; Hunt, J.; Jennions, Michael

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If sexually selected traits reveal a male's heterozygosity or condition to females, then such traits should exhibit declines with inbreeding. We tested this by examining the effect of inbreeding on advertisement calling in male crickets Teleogryllus commodus. We investigated the effect of one generation of full-sibling mating on calling effort and fine-scale call structure. Inbreeding reduced calling effort but had no effect on call structure. We then compared the attractiveness of inbred and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDrayton, Jean
dc.contributor.authorMilner, Richard
dc.contributor.authorHunt, J.
dc.contributor.authorJennions, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:03:12Z
dc.identifier.issn0014-3820
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/62064
dc.description.abstractIf sexually selected traits reveal a male's heterozygosity or condition to females, then such traits should exhibit declines with inbreeding. We tested this by examining the effect of inbreeding on advertisement calling in male crickets Teleogryllus commodus. We investigated the effect of one generation of full-sibling mating on calling effort and fine-scale call structure. Inbreeding reduced calling effort but had no effect on call structure. We then compared the attractiveness of inbred and outbred calls in the field by monitoring how many wild females were attracted to each call type. From the field data, we conducted a selection analysis to identify the major axes of linear and nonlinear multivariate sexual selection on call structure. A comparison of multivariate attractiveness of inbred and outbred calls along each major axis of selection revealed no difference in attractiveness. Our results suggest that inbred male calls have a fine-scale structure that is no less attractive to females than that of outbred calls. However, because inbred males call less often, and female T. commodus prefer males with a higher calling effort, inbred males will suffer reductions in mating success. Females who base mate choice on call rate are therefore using a signal correlated with male heterozygosity and/or condition.
dc.publisherSociety for the Study of Evolution
dc.sourceEvolution
dc.subjectKeywords: comparative study; cricket; experimental study; fieldwork; heterozygosity; inbreeding; mate attraction; mate choice; mating success; sexual selection; vocalization; animal; article; auditory stimulation; female; genetic selection; genetics; Gryllidae; het Call structure; Calling effort; Heterozygosity; Male attractiveness; Selection analysis; Sexual selection
dc.titleInbreeding and advertisement calling in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus : laboratory and field experiments
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume64
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor060201 - Behavioural Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB664
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDrayton, Jean, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMilner, Richard, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHunt, J., University of Exeter
local.contributor.affiliationJennions, Michael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue10
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage3069
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage3083
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01053.x
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T12:07:33Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-78649248350
local.identifier.thomsonID000282573800020
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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