Skip navigation
Skip navigation

The Peopling of Sahul and Near Oceania

O'Connor, Susan; Hiscock, Peter

Description

Sahul, comprising Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea was colonized from Sunda, the enlarged southernmost extension of Eurasia, by anatomically modern Homo sapiens over 50,000 years ago. Pleistocene colonization of Sahul required watercraft to cross the perpetual island region of Wallacea, wherein populations adjusted to changing patterns of floral and faunal diversity. Once in Sahul, populations quickly adapted to the varying resources, developed regional differences in technology and culture,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Susan
dc.contributor.authorHiscock, Peter
dc.contributor.editorEthan Cochrane
dc.contributor.editorTerry Hunt
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:02:02Z
dc.identifier.isbn9780199925070
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/61835
dc.description.abstractSahul, comprising Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea was colonized from Sunda, the enlarged southernmost extension of Eurasia, by anatomically modern Homo sapiens over 50,000 years ago. Pleistocene colonization of Sahul required watercraft to cross the perpetual island region of Wallacea, wherein populations adjusted to changing patterns of floral and faunal diversity. Once in Sahul, populations quickly adapted to the varying resources, developed regional differences in technology and culture, and likely contributed to megafaunal extinctions also influenced by environmental change. Ancient DNA and skeletal studies indicate that after colonization, Sahul was largely isolated from other populations. The earliest humans to inhabit Near Oceania, the islands northeast of New Guinea, arrived approximately 45,000 years ago. While the sophistication of their earliest navigational technology is debated, by 20,000 years ago these populations engaged in increasingly frequent voyaging, translocating New Guinea mainland fauna to the islands and moving valuable stone resources over hundreds of kilometers.
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.relation.ispartofThe Oxford Handbook of Prehistoric Oceania
dc.rightshttps://global.oup.com/academic/rights/permissions/autperm/?cc=au&lang=en&..."OUP is pleased to grant this permission for the following uses: posting on the your own personal website or in an institutional or subject based repository after a 12 month period for Science and Medical titles and a 24 month period for Academic, Trade and Reference titles. one chapter or up to 10% of the total of your single author or co-authored book" from the publisher site (as at 6/03/2018) -O'Connor, Sue, and Peter Hiscock. "The peopling of Sahul and near oceania." The Oxford Handbook of Prehistoric Oceania. 2014, by permission of Oxford University Press. The work was originally published at -http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199925070.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780199925070-e-002
dc.titleThe Peopling of Sahul and Near Oceania
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor210106 - Archaeology of New Guinea and Pacific Islands (excl. New Zealand)
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4455832xPUB643
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationO'Connor, Susan, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHiscock, Peter, University of Sydney
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage17
local.identifier.doi10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199925070.013.002
dc.date.updated2020-11-22T07:37:41Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationOxford
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_O'Connor_The_Peopling_of_Sahul_and_Near_2014.pdf499.17 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator