Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Spatial seed and pollen games: dispersal, sex allocation, and the evolution of dioecy

Fromhage, Lutz; Kokko, Hanna

Description

The evolutionary forces shaping within- and across-species variation in the investment in male and female sex function are still incompletely understood. Despite earlier suggestions that in plants the evolution or cosexuality vs. dioecy, as well as sex allocation among cosexuals, is affected by seed and pollen dispersal, no formal model has explicitly used dispersal distances to address this problem. Here, we present a game-theory model as well as a simulation study that fills in this gap. Our...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFromhage, Lutz
dc.contributor.authorKokko, Hanna
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:01:55Z
dc.identifier.issn1010-061X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/61801
dc.description.abstractThe evolutionary forces shaping within- and across-species variation in the investment in male and female sex function are still incompletely understood. Despite earlier suggestions that in plants the evolution or cosexuality vs. dioecy, as well as sex allocation among cosexuals, is affected by seed and pollen dispersal, no formal model has explicitly used dispersal distances to address this problem. Here, we present a game-theory model as well as a simulation study that fills in this gap. Our model predicts that dioecy should evolve if seeds and pollen disperse widely and that sex allocation among cosexuals should be biased towards whichever sex function produces more widely dispersing units. Dispersal limitations stabilize cosexuality by reinforcing competition between spatially clumped dispersal units from the same source, leading to saturating fitness returns that render sexual specialization unprofitable. However, limited pollen dispersal can also increase the risk of selfing, thus potentially selecting for dioecy as an outbreeding mechanism. Finally, we refute a recent claim that cosexuals should always invest equally in both sex functions.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceJournal of Evolutionary Biology
dc.subjectKeywords: autogamy; dioecy; dispersal; evolutionary biology; fitness; game theory; hermaphrodite; numerical model; pollen; reproductive cost; reproductive strategy; sex allocation; sex ratio; specialization; article; biological model; evolution; physiology; plant s Cosexual; Game theory; Hermaphrodite; Pollination; Sex ratio; Sexual systems
dc.titleSpatial seed and pollen games: dispersal, sex allocation, and the evolution of dioecy
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume23
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor060303 - Biological Adaptation
local.identifier.absfor060308 - Life Histories
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB640
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFromhage, Lutz, University of Hamburg
local.contributor.affiliationKokko, Hanna, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1947
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1956
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1420-9101.2010.02057.x
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
local.identifier.absseo960806 - Forest and Woodlands Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T12:07:21Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77955977678
local.identifier.thomsonID000281141800013
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Fromhage_Spatial_seed_and_pollen_games:_2010.pdf429.88 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator