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'Incorrect, loose and coarse terms': classifying nineteenth century English-language causes of death for modern use. An example using Tasmanian data

Kippen, Rebecca

Description

This paper outlines a cause-of-death classification system applicable to nineteenth-century English-language death data. Consisting of 32 categories, this system combines aspects of William Farr's nosology, developed in nineteenth-century Britain, and the modern International Classification of Diseases. It is sufficiently broad for meaningful categories to be created for analytical purposes, but specific enough for particular cause-of-death trends and patterns to be traced. Individual-level...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorKippen, Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:00:19Z
dc.identifier.issn1443-2447
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/61303
dc.description.abstractThis paper outlines a cause-of-death classification system applicable to nineteenth-century English-language death data. Consisting of 32 categories, this system combines aspects of William Farr's nosology, developed in nineteenth-century Britain, and the modern International Classification of Diseases. It is sufficiently broad for meaningful categories to be created for analytical purposes, but specific enough for particular cause-of-death trends and patterns to be traced. Individual-level death registration data from the British colony of Tasmania, 1838-1899, are used to demonstrate the application of this classification system. The paper describes the history of recording causes of death in nineteenth-century Tasmania and discusses several problems particular to nineteenth-century cause-of-death data. The benefits and disadvantages of three existing nosologies, Farr's, Preston's and the International Classification of Diseases, are considered with reference to nineteenth-century data. The final sections outline the data and method, and discuss an application of the classification system developed for cause-specific child mortality in nineteenth-century Tasmania.
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.sourceJournal of Population Research
dc.subjectKeywords: cause of death; classification; data set; disease incidence; language; mortality; nineteenth century; Australia; Tasmania; United Kingdom Australia; Causes of death; Classification; Nineteenth century; Nosology
dc.title'Incorrect, loose and coarse terms': classifying nineteenth century English-language causes of death for modern use. An example using Tasmanian data
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume28
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor160304 - Mortality
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9406909xPUB601
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationKippen, Rebecca, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage267
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage291
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s12546-011-9065-2
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T11:59:42Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-80053927692
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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