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Feedback in the cores of clusters A3581, 2A 0335+096, and sersic 159-03

Farage, Catherine; McGregor, Peter; Dopita, Michael

Description

The cores of massive galaxy clusters, where hot gas is cooling rapidly, appear to undergo cycles of self-regulating energy feedback, in which active galactic nucleus (AGN) outbursts in the central galaxies episodically provide sufficient heating to offset much of the gas cooling. We use deep integral-field spectroscopy to study the optical line emission from the extended nebulae of three nearby brightest cluster galaxies and investigate how they are related to the processes of heating and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFarage, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorMcGregor, Peter
dc.contributor.authorDopita, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:59:47Z
dc.identifier.issn0004-637X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/61253
dc.description.abstractThe cores of massive galaxy clusters, where hot gas is cooling rapidly, appear to undergo cycles of self-regulating energy feedback, in which active galactic nucleus (AGN) outbursts in the central galaxies episodically provide sufficient heating to offset much of the gas cooling. We use deep integral-field spectroscopy to study the optical line emission from the extended nebulae of three nearby brightest cluster galaxies and investigate how they are related to the processes of heating and cooling in the cluster cores. Two of these systems, A3581 and Sersic159-03, appear to be experiencing phases of feedback that are dominated by the activity and output of a central AGN. A3581 shows evidence for significant interaction between the radio outflows and the optical nebula, in addition to accretion flows into the nucleus of the galaxy. X-ray and radio data show that Sersic159-03 is dominated by the feedback of energy from the central AGN, but the kinematics of the optical nebula are consistent with infall or outflow of material along its bright filaments. The third system, 2A0335+096, is dominated by mass accretion and cooling, and so we suggest that it is in an accumulation phase of the feedback cycle. The outer nebula forms a disk-like structure, 14kpc in radius, that rotates about the central galaxy with a velocity amplitude of 200kms -1. Overall, our data are consistent with ongoing AGN-driven feedback cycles occurring in these systems.
dc.publisherIOP Publishing
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.sourceAstrophysical Journal, The
dc.subjectKeywords: galaxies: clusters: individual (A3581, 2A 0335+096, Sersic 159-03); galaxies: elliptical and lenticular, cD; galaxies: ISM; techniques: imaging spectroscopy
dc.titleFeedback in the cores of clusters A3581, 2A 0335+096, and sersic 159-03
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume747
dc.date.issued2012
local.identifier.absfor020199 - Astronomical and Space Sciences not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB598
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFarage, Catherine, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMcGregor, Peter, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDopita, Michael, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage18
local.identifier.doi10.1088/0004-637X/747/1/28
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:27:27Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84857349380
local.identifier.thomsonID000300627300028
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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