Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Identification of the woods used to make the Riley Cabinet: A historically-significant example of early Australian, convict-built, furniture

Heady, Roger; Peters, G.N.; Evans, Philip

Description

The Riley cabinet is a historically-significant piece of Australian furniture built by convict artisans in 1817-1820, only 30 years after colonisation of Australia began. The timber species used to make the cabinet were hitherto unknown. This paper describes the novel use of a truncated veterinary syringe needle as a minimally-invasive tool for obtaining very small wood-identification samples from the cabinet. We also describe how, using utmost economy of sample material, we identified the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHeady, Roger
dc.contributor.authorPeters, G.N.
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Philip
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:59:32Z
dc.identifier.issn0928-1541
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/61131
dc.description.abstractThe Riley cabinet is a historically-significant piece of Australian furniture built by convict artisans in 1817-1820, only 30 years after colonisation of Australia began. The timber species used to make the cabinet were hitherto unknown. This paper describes the novel use of a truncated veterinary syringe needle as a minimally-invasive tool for obtaining very small wood-identification samples from the cabinet. We also describe how, using utmost economy of sample material, we identified the different cabinet woods, with varying levels of precision. Identification of the thirteen species encountered relied on macroscopic and microscopic features of the woods and consideration of the availability of different timbers to the cabinet-maker at the time the cabinet was made. We conclude that the early British settlers of Australia rapidly gained knowledge of the wide variety of indigenous woods suitable for cabinet manufacture, and suggest that the methods used to sample and identify the woods in the Riley cabinet may have wider application for identifying woods found in other historically-significant wooden objects.
dc.publisherNational Herbarium and Botanic Gardens
dc.sourceInternational Association Wood Anatomists Journal (IAWA)
dc.subjectKeywords: Cabinet; Historically- significant; Microscopy; Veterinary syringe needle; Wood identification
dc.titleIdentification of the woods used to make the Riley Cabinet: A historically-significant example of early Australian, convict-built, furniture
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume31
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor070599 - Forestry Sciences not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4279067xPUB589
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHeady, Roger, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPeters, G.N., Patinations Conservation Services Pty Ltd
local.contributor.affiliationEvans, Philip, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage385
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage397
local.identifier.absseo820199 - Forestry not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:52:07Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-78649861653
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Heady_Identification_of_the_woods_2010.pdf1.09 MBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  17 November 2022/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator