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Spatial distribution of water supply in the Coterminous United States

Brown, Thomas C; Hobbins, Michael; Ramirez, Jorge A

Description

Available water supply across the contiguous 48 states was estimated as precipitation minus evapotranspiration using data for the period 1953-1994. Precipitation estimates were taken from the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM). Evapotranspiration was estimated using two models, the Advection-Aridity model and the Zhang model. The evapotranspiration models were calibrated using precipitation and runoff data for 655 hydrologically undisturbed basins, and then...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBrown, Thomas C
dc.contributor.authorHobbins, Michael
dc.contributor.authorRamirez, Jorge A
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:59:31Z
dc.identifier.issn1093-474X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/61121
dc.description.abstractAvailable water supply across the contiguous 48 states was estimated as precipitation minus evapotranspiration using data for the period 1953-1994. Precipitation estimates were taken from the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM). Evapotranspiration was estimated using two models, the Advection-Aridity model and the Zhang model. The evapotranspiration models were calibrated using precipitation and runoff data for 655 hydrologically undisturbed basins, and then tested using estimates of natural runoff for the 18 water resource regions (WRR) of the 48 contiguous states. The final water supply coverage reflects a mixture of outputs from the two evapotranspiration models. Political, administrative, and land cover boundaries were mapped over the coverage of mean annual water supply. Across the entire study area, we find that 53% of the water supply originates on forested land, which covers only 29% of the surface area, and that 24% originates on federal lands, including 18% on national forests and grasslands alone. Forests and federal lands are even more important in the West (the 11 western contiguous states), where 65% of the water supply originates on forested land and 66% on federal lands, with national forests and grasslands contributing 51%.
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.sourceJournal of The American Water Resources Association
dc.subjectKeywords: Evapotranspiration; Patient monitoring; Runoff; Size distribution; Water resources; Water supply; Water supply systems; Evapotranspiration models; Federal lands; Forests; Land covers; National forests; Natural runoffs; Precipitation estimates; Runoff datu Evapotranspiration; Forests; Runoff; Water supply
dc.titleSpatial distribution of water supply in the Coterminous United States
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume44
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor060208 - Terrestrial Ecology
local.identifier.absfor040608 - Surfacewater Hydrology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9204316xPUB588
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBrown, Thomas C, US Forest Service
local.contributor.affiliationHobbins, Michael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRamirez, Jorge A, Colorado State University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage14
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1752-1688.2008.00252.x
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T11:52:43Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-57449099752
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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