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Characterization of TCTP, the translationally controlled tumor protein, from Arabidopsis thaliana

Berkowitz, Oliver; Jost, Ricarda; Pollmann, Stephan; Masle, Josette

Description

The translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is an important component of the TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling pathway, the major regulator of cell growth in animals and fungi. TCTP acts as the guanine nucleotide exchange factor of the Ras GTPase Rheb that controls TOR activity in Drosophila melanogaster. We therefore examined the role of Arabidopsis thaliana TCTP in planta. Plant TCTPs exhibit distinct sequence differences from nonplant homologs but share the key GTPase binding...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBerkowitz, Oliver
dc.contributor.authorJost, Ricarda
dc.contributor.authorPollmann, Stephan
dc.contributor.authorMasle, Josette
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:59:28Z
dc.identifier.issn1040-4651
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/61095
dc.description.abstractThe translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is an important component of the TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling pathway, the major regulator of cell growth in animals and fungi. TCTP acts as the guanine nucleotide exchange factor of the Ras GTPase Rheb that controls TOR activity in Drosophila melanogaster. We therefore examined the role of Arabidopsis thaliana TCTP in planta. Plant TCTPs exhibit distinct sequence differences from nonplant homologs but share the key GTPase binding surface. Green fluorescent protein reporter lines show that Arabidopsis TCTP is expressed throughout plant tissues and developmental stages with increased expression in meristematic and expanding cells. Knockout of TCTP leads to a male gametophytic phenotype with normal pollen formation and germination but impaired pollen tube growth. Silencing of TCTP by RNA interference slows vegetative growth; leaf expansion is reduced because of smaller cell size, lateral root formation is reduced, and root hair development is impaired. Furthermore, these lines show decreased sensitivity to an exogenously applied auxin analog and have elevated levels of endogenous auxin. These results identify TCTP as an important regulator of growth in plants and imply a function of plant TCTP as a mediator of TOR activity similar to that known in nonplant systems.
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Plant Biologists
dc.sourceThe Plant Cell
dc.subjectKeywords: Arabidopsis protein; amino acid sequence; Arabidopsis; article; chemistry; gene expression profiling; genetics; growth, development and aging; immunoblotting; metabolism; molecular genetics; physiology; plant root; pollen; protein secondary structure; rev
dc.titleCharacterization of TCTP, the translationally controlled tumor protein, from Arabidopsis thaliana
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume20
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor060602 - Animal Physiology - Cell
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9204316xPUB586
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBerkowitz, Oliver, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationJost, Ricarda, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPollmann, Stephan, Ruhr-University Bochum
local.contributor.affiliationMasle, Josette , College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage3430
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage3447
local.identifier.doi10.1105/tpc.108.061010
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T11:52:41Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-62549120014
local.identifier.thomsonID000262861700023
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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