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Flowering in snow tussock (Chionochloa spp.) is influenced by temperature and hormonal cues

Turnbull, Matthew H; Pharis, Richard; Kurepin, Leonid V; Sarfati, Michal; Mander, Lewis; Kelly, Dave

Description

Snow tussocks (Chionochloa spp.) in New Zealand exhibit extreme mast (episodic) seeding which has important implications for plant ecology and plantinsect interactions. Heavy flowering appears to be triggered by very warm/dry summers in the preceding year. In order to investigate the physiological basis for mast flowering, mature snow tussock plants in the field and younger plants in a glasshouse and shadehouse were subjected to a range of manipulative treatments. Field treatments included...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorTurnbull, Matthew H
dc.contributor.authorPharis, Richard
dc.contributor.authorKurepin, Leonid V
dc.contributor.authorSarfati, Michal
dc.contributor.authorMander, Lewis
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Dave
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:58:16Z
dc.identifier.issn1445-4408
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/60784
dc.description.abstractSnow tussocks (Chionochloa spp.) in New Zealand exhibit extreme mast (episodic) seeding which has important implications for plant ecology and plantinsect interactions. Heavy flowering appears to be triggered by very warm/dry summers in the preceding year. In order to investigate the physiological basis for mast flowering, mature snow tussock plants in the field and younger plants in a glasshouse and shadehouse were subjected to a range of manipulative treatments. Field treatments included combinations of warming, root pruning and applications of two native gibberellins (GAs) GA3, which is known to be highly floral inductive and GA4, which is associated with continued floral apex development in another long-day grass. Warming, GA3 alone and especially warming+GA3, significantly promoted flowering, as did applications of GA4 alone and GA4+CCC (2-chloroethyltrimethylammonium chloride, which is a known synergist of GA3-induced flowering in the annual grass, Lolium temulentum L.). Our results provide support for the concept that mast flowering events in tussock species are causally related to high temperature-induced increases in endogenous gibberellin levels. It is likely that GAs (endogenous or applied) promote the continued development of a previously long-day induced floral apex. In addition to the promotion of flowering, applied GA3 also disturbed the plant's innate resource threshold requirements, as shown by the death, over winter, of many non-flowering tillers. Applied GA4 did not show this effect, likely due to its rapid catabolic metabolism to an inactive form. High temperature-induced flowering mediated by elevated levels of endogenous floral-promotive GAs could have important implications for regulating the evolutionary interaction between these masting plants and their seed predators.
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.sourceFunctional Plant Biology
dc.subjectKeywords: adaptation; catabolism; chemical cue; chloride; flowering; global warming; grass; high temperature; hormone; limiting factor; plant-insect interaction; seed predation; temperature effect; threshold; New Zealand; Chionochloa; Chionochloa pallens; Chionochl Chionochloa pallens ssp. cadens; Chionochloa rubra ssp. cuprea; gibberellins; hormones; mast seeding; predator satiation; resource limitation; root pruning; temperature
dc.titleFlowering in snow tussock (Chionochloa spp.) is influenced by temperature and hormonal cues
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume39
dc.date.issued2012
local.identifier.absfor030503 - Organic Chemical Synthesis
local.identifier.absfor070303 - Crop and Pasture Biochemistry and Physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4005981xPUB563
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationTurnbull, Matthew H, University of Canterbury
local.contributor.affiliationPharis, Richard, University of Calgary
local.contributor.affiliationKurepin, Leonid V, University of Calgary
local.contributor.affiliationSarfati, Michal, University of Cnaterbury
local.contributor.affiliationMander, Lewis, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKelly, Dave, University of Canterbury
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage38
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage50
local.identifier.doi10.1071/FP11116
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:24:48Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84855957803
local.identifier.thomsonID000299052100003
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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