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When more is less: Associations between corpus callosum size and handedness lateralization

Luders, Eileen; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Thompson, Paul M; Gutman, Boris; Sachdev, Perminder Singh; Toga, Arthur W.; Anstey, Kaarin

Description

Although not consistently replicated, a substantial number of studies suggest that left-handers have larger callosal regions than right-handers. We challenge this notion and propose that callosal size is not linked to left-handedness or right-handedness per se but to the degree of handedness lateralization. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the thickness of the corpus callosum in a large data set (n=361). We analyzed the correlations between callosal thickness and the degree of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLuders, Eileen
dc.contributor.authorCherbuin, Nicolas
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Paul M
dc.contributor.authorGutman, Boris
dc.contributor.authorSachdev, Perminder Singh
dc.contributor.authorToga, Arthur W.
dc.contributor.authorAnstey, Kaarin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:58:01Z
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/60671
dc.description.abstractAlthough not consistently replicated, a substantial number of studies suggest that left-handers have larger callosal regions than right-handers. We challenge this notion and propose that callosal size is not linked to left-handedness or right-handedness per se but to the degree of handedness lateralization. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the thickness of the corpus callosum in a large data set (n=361). We analyzed the correlations between callosal thickness and the degree of handedness lateralization in 324 right-handers and 37 left-handers at 100 equidistant points across the corpus callosum. We revealed significant negative correlations within the anterior and posterior midbody suggesting that larger callosal dimensions in these regions are associated with a weaker handedness lateralization. Significant positive correlations were completely absent. In addition, we compared callosal thickness between moderately lateralized left-handers (n=37) and three equally sized groups (n=37) of right-handers (strongly, moderately, and weakly lateralized). The outcomes of these group analyses confirmed the negative association between callosal size and handedness lateralization, although callosal differences between right- and left-handers did not reach statistical significance. This suggests that callosal differences are rather small, if examined as a dichotomy between two handedness groups. Future studies will expand this line of research by increasing the number of left-handers to boost statistical power and by combining macro- and microstructural, as well as functional and behavioral measurements to identify the biological mechanisms linking callosal morphology and handedness lateralization.
dc.publisherAcademic Press
dc.sourceNeuroimage
dc.subjectKeywords: adult; article; brain size; controlled study; corpus callosum; correlation analysis; female; handedness; hemispheric dominance; human; left handedness; male; neuroimaging; normal human; priority journal; right handedness; Adult; Corpus Callosum; Databases Corpus callosum; Handedness; Lateralization; MRI
dc.titleWhen more is less: Associations between corpus callosum size and handedness lateralization
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume52
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor110900 - NEUROSCIENCES
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4105084xPUB555
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLuders, Eileen, UCLA School of Medicine
local.contributor.affiliationCherbuin, Nicolas, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationThompson, Paul M, UCLA School of Medicine
local.contributor.affiliationGutman, Boris, UCLA School of Medicine
local.contributor.affiliationAnstey, Kaarin, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSachdev, Perminder Singh, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationToga, Arthur W., UCLA School of Medicine
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage43
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage49
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.04.016
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:36:25Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77953290894
local.identifier.thomsonID000278637700005
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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