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A Saturated History of Christianity and Cloth in Oceania

Jolly, Margaret

Description

Cloth and Christianity have long been seen as intimate partners in Oceania. The introduction of manufactured cloth�cambric,2 calico, chintz, linen, serge and silk�from the mills of Manchester and New England and the workshops of China, the cultivation of the arts of sewing, quilting and embroidery and the adoption of Western-style clothing: modest dresses for women, demure trousers or laplaps for men, have all become iconic of Oceanic Christianity. Integral to the �before and after� story of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorJolly, Margaret
dc.contributor.editorHyaeweol Choi
dc.contributor.editorMargaret Jolly
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:56:20Z
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-925021943
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/60198
dc.description.abstractCloth and Christianity have long been seen as intimate partners in Oceania. The introduction of manufactured cloth�cambric,2 calico, chintz, linen, serge and silk�from the mills of Manchester and New England and the workshops of China, the cultivation of the arts of sewing, quilting and embroidery and the adoption of Western-style clothing: modest dresses for women, demure trousers or laplaps for men, have all become iconic of Oceanic Christianity. Integral to the �before and after� story of indigenous conversion is the narrative of how Oceanic Christians �covered up� beautiful bare breasts, exposed bottoms or penises previously proudly displayed. In the eyes of some scholars and popular observers Oceanic people thus succumbed to the colonial power of a Western Victorian model of gender and sexuality, characterised by heterosexual monogamy, modesty and sexual repression and the celebration of a novel form of domesticity focused on the faithful wife and good mother. She was allegedly both creator and creature of a �home,� bearing and nurturing children, cooking, cleaning, washing, sewing. Many scholars have challenged and complicated such stories from the perspective of Europe, North America, Africa and Asia: revealing the class, national and regional specificities in the emergence of ideals of �domesticity�; demonstrating how the realities of working women�s lives differed markedly from any idealised demarcations of a masculine public sphere and a feminine domestic sphere; arguing that these spheres were leaky rather than hermetically sealed.
dc.format.extent26 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherANU Press
dc.relation.ispartofDivine Domesticities: Christian Paradoxes in Asia and the Pacific
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.sourceDivine Domesticities: Christian Paradoxes in Asia and the Pacific
dc.source.urihttp://press.anu.edu.au/apps/bookworm/view/Divine+Domesticities+Christian+Paradoxes+in+Asia+and+the+Pacific/11241/ch16.xhtml
dc.titleA Saturated History of Christianity and Cloth in Oceania
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor160104 - Social and Cultural Anthropology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4455832xPUB527
local.publisher.urlhttp://press.anu.edu.au/
local.type.statusMetadata only
local.contributor.affiliationJolly, Margaret, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage429
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage454
local.identifier.doi10.22459/DD.10.2014.16
dc.date.updated2020-11-22T07:37:29Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationCanberra, ACT, Australia
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access via publisher website
CollectionsANU Press (1965-Present)

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