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The role of timber tree species in the nutritional ecology of spider monkeys in a certified logging concession, Bolivia

Felton, Annika M; Felton, Adam; Foley, William; Lindenmayer, David B

Description

Selective harvesting of timber can lead to population declines in some primate species. As frugivorous primates are important seed dispersers in tropical forests, the reduction of their populations may affect the ecological sustainability of selectively logged forests. This paper is the first to quantify the importance of timber tree species in the diet and nutritional ecology of a primate species. We studied spider monkeys (Ateles chamek) inhabiting a certified forestry concession in Bolivia...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFelton, Annika M
dc.contributor.authorFelton, Adam
dc.contributor.authorFoley, William
dc.contributor.authorLindenmayer, David B
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:56:18Z
dc.date.available2015-12-10T22:56:18Z
dc.identifier.issn0378-1127
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/60186
dc.description.abstractSelective harvesting of timber can lead to population declines in some primate species. As frugivorous primates are important seed dispersers in tropical forests, the reduction of their populations may affect the ecological sustainability of selectively logged forests. This paper is the first to quantify the importance of timber tree species in the diet and nutritional ecology of a primate species. We studied spider monkeys (Ateles chamek) inhabiting a certified forestry concession in Bolivia where post-logging population declines of this species have been recorded. We show that spider monkeys occupying unlogged areas obtained approximately 50% of their total intake of macro-nutrients from timber tree species and exhibited a distinct preference for foraging within trees that were of harvestable size. Timber tree species dominated the spider monkeys' diet both during peak fruiting periods and during periods of fruit scarcity. We estimate that under current timber extraction intensities spider monkeys lose significant proportions of their food sources. Our results indicate that further extraction limits could be considered for Ficus boliviana, Spondias mombin and Pouteria nemorosa. We suggest that to ensure long-term ecological sustainability of certified forestry concessions, the importance of timber tree species in the ecology of seed dispersers needs to be taken into account.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceForest Ecology and Management
dc.subjectKeywords: Ecological sustainability; Ficus; Food sources; Nutritional ecology; Population decline; Primate species; Reduced-impact logging; Seed dispersers; Selective harvesting; Spondias mombin; Staple food; Timber extraction; Tree species; Tropical forest; Agricu Conservation; Diet; Ficus; Primate; Reduced-impact logging; Staple food
dc.titleThe role of timber tree species in the nutritional ecology of spider monkeys in a certified logging concession, Bolivia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume259
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor050211 - Wildlife and Habitat Management
local.identifier.absfor060208 - Terrestrial Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB526
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFelton, Annika M, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationFelton, Adam, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationFoley, William, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLindenmayer, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1642
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1649
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.foreco.2010.01.042
local.identifier.absseo960806 - Forest and Woodlands Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T12:06:38Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77649273938
local.identifier.thomsonID000276292900032
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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