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Designing photosystem II: molecular engineering of photo-catalytic proteins

Conlan, Brendon

Description

Biological photosynthesis utilizes membrane-bound pigment/protein complexes to convert light into chemical energy through a series of electron-transfer events. In the unique photosystem II (PSII) complex these electron-transfer events result in the oxidation of water to molecular oxygen. PSII is an extremely complex enzyme and in order to exploit its unique ability to convert sunlight into chemical energy it will be necessary to make a minimal model. Here we will briefly describe how PSII...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorConlan, Brendon
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:56:17Z
dc.date.available2015-12-10T22:56:17Z
dc.identifier.issn0166-8595
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/60183
dc.description.abstractBiological photosynthesis utilizes membrane-bound pigment/protein complexes to convert light into chemical energy through a series of electron-transfer events. In the unique photosystem II (PSII) complex these electron-transfer events result in the oxidation of water to molecular oxygen. PSII is an extremely complex enzyme and in order to exploit its unique ability to convert sunlight into chemical energy it will be necessary to make a minimal model. Here we will briefly describe how PSII functions and identify those aspects that are essential in order to catalyze the oxidation of water into O2, and review previous attempts to design simple photo-catalytic proteins and summarize our current research exploiting the E. coli bacterioferritin protein as a scaffold into which multiple cofactors can be bound, to oxidize a manganese metal center upon illumination. Through the reverse engineering of PSII and light driven water splitting reactions it may be possible to provide a blueprint for catalysts that can produce clean green fuel for human energy needs.
dc.publisherKluwer Academic Publishers
dc.sourcePhotosynthesis Research
dc.subjectKeywords: bacterial protein; bacterioferritin; cytochrome b; ferritin; protein; chemistry; photolysis; photosystem II; protein engineering; review; Bacterial Proteins; Cytochrome b Group; Ferritins; Photolysis; Photosystem II Protein Complex; Protein Engineering; P Artificial photosynthesis; Bacterioferritin; Electron transfer; Manganese; Photosystem II; Protein engineering; Water splitting; Zinc chlorin e6
dc.titleDesigning photosystem II: molecular engineering of photo-catalytic proteins
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume98
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor060101 - Analytical Biochemistry
local.identifier.absfor100301 - Biocatalysis and Enzyme Technology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9204316xPUB526
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationConlan, Brendon, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage687
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage700
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s11120-008-9355-5
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T11:52:21Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-57849138411
local.identifier.thomsonID000261577900059
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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