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Democracy as a Modally Demanding Value

Southwood, Nicholas

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Imperialism seems to be deeply antithetical to democracy. Yet, at least one form of imperialism � what I call �hands-off imperialism � seems to be perfectly compatible with the kind of self-governance commonly thought to be the hallmark of democracy. The solution to this puzzle is to recognize that democracy involves more than self-governance. Rather, it involves what I call self-rule. Self-rule is an example of what Philip Pettit has called a modally demanding value. Modally demanding values...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSouthwood, Nicholas
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:54:49Z
dc.identifier.issn0029-4624
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/59816
dc.description.abstractImperialism seems to be deeply antithetical to democracy. Yet, at least one form of imperialism � what I call �hands-off imperialism � seems to be perfectly compatible with the kind of self-governance commonly thought to be the hallmark of democracy. The solution to this puzzle is to recognize that democracy involves more than self-governance. Rather, it involves what I call self-rule. Self-rule is an example of what Philip Pettit has called a modally demanding value. Modally demanding values are, roughly, values the instantiation of which depends not only on what actually happens, but on what would happen in certain non-actual circumstances. Self-rule is the modally demanding counterpart of self-governance, since it requires, not merely that the members of a state actually govern themselves, but that they would continue to do so across a range of non-actual situations. Moreover, the value of self-rule (and hence democracy) is not reducible to the value of self-governance. Understanding the modally demanding character of democracy allows us to appreciate what is democratically objectionable about occupation by a foreign power, even if there is no prospect of the foreign power intervening in the governance of the occupied state by its members.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceNous
dc.titleDemocracy as a Modally Demanding Value
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume47
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor160609 - Political Theory and Political Philosophy
local.identifier.absfor220305 - Ethical Theory
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4326120xPUB509
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSouthwood, Nicholas, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage18
local.identifier.doi10.1111/nous.12021
local.identifier.absseo970122 - Expanding Knowledge in Philosophy and Religious Studies
local.identifier.absseo950407 - Social Ethics
dc.date.updated2015-12-10T07:45:03Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84876296396
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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