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Fire management for biodiversity conservation: Key research questions and our capacity to answer them

Driscoll, Don; Bennett, Andrew; Bode, Michael; Bradstock, Ross A.; Cary, Geoffrey; Clarke, Michael F.; Dexter, Nick; Fensham, Rod; Friend, Gordon; Gill, A Malcom; James, Stewart; Kay, Geoff; Keith, David A.; MacGregor, Chris; Russell-Smith, Jeremy; Salt, David; Watson, James E.M.; Williams, Richard J; York, Alan; Lindenmayer, David B

Description

Knowing how species respond to fire regimes is essential for ecologically sustainable management. This axiom raises two important questions: (1) what knowledge is the most important to develop and (2) to what extent can current research methods deliver that knowledge? We identify three areas of required knowledge: (i) a mechanistic understanding of species' responses to fire regimes; (ii) knowledge of how the spatial and temporal arrangement of fires influences the biota; and (iii) an...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDriscoll, Don
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorBode, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBradstock, Ross A.
dc.contributor.authorCary, Geoffrey
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Michael F.
dc.contributor.authorDexter, Nick
dc.contributor.authorFensham, Rod
dc.contributor.authorFriend, Gordon
dc.contributor.authorGill, A Malcom
dc.contributor.authorJames, Stewart
dc.contributor.authorKay, Geoff
dc.contributor.authorKeith, David A.
dc.contributor.authorMacGregor, Chris
dc.contributor.authorRussell-Smith, Jeremy
dc.contributor.authorSalt, David
dc.contributor.authorWatson, James E.M.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Richard J
dc.contributor.authorYork, Alan
dc.contributor.authorLindenmayer, David B
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:54:49Z
dc.identifier.issn0006-3207
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/59815
dc.description.abstractKnowing how species respond to fire regimes is essential for ecologically sustainable management. This axiom raises two important questions: (1) what knowledge is the most important to develop and (2) to what extent can current research methods deliver that knowledge? We identify three areas of required knowledge: (i) a mechanistic understanding of species' responses to fire regimes; (ii) knowledge of how the spatial and temporal arrangement of fires influences the biota; and (iii) an understanding of interactions of fire regimes with other processes. We review the capacity of empirical research to address these knowledge gaps, and reveal many limitations. Manipulative experiments are limited by the number and scope of treatments that can be applied, natural experiments are limited by treatment availability and confounding factors, and longitudinal studies are difficult to maintain, particularly due to unplanned disturbance events. Simulation modelling is limited by the quality of the underlying empirical data and by uncertainty in how well model structure represents reality. Due to the constraints on large-scale, long-term research, the potential for management experiments to inform adaptive management is limited. Rather than simply recommending adaptive management, we define a research agenda to maximise the rate of learning in this difficult field. This includes measuring responses at a species level, building capacity to implement natural experiments, undertaking simulation modelling, and judicious application of experimental approaches. Developing ecologically sustainable fire management practices will require sustained research effort and a sophisticated research agenda based on carefully targeting appropriate methods to address critical management questions.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceBiological Conservation
dc.subjectKeywords: adaptive management; biodiversity; empirical analysis; environmental disturbance; experimental study; fire behavior; fire management; knowledge; management practice; numerical model; policy approach; prescribed burning; research work; spatiotemporal analy Management actions; Planned burn; Policy implications; Prescribed fire; Wildfire
dc.titleFire management for biodiversity conservation: Key research questions and our capacity to answer them
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume143
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor050202 - Conservation and Biodiversity
local.identifier.ariespublicationU4279067xPUB509
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDriscoll, Don, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLindenmayer, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBennett, Andrew, Deakin University
local.contributor.affiliationBode, Michael, University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationBradstock, Ross A., University of Wollongong
local.contributor.affiliationCary, Geoffrey, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationClarke, Michael F., La Trobe University
local.contributor.affiliationDexter, Nick, Parks Australia
local.contributor.affiliationFensham, Rod, Queensland Herbarium
local.contributor.affiliationFriend, Gordon, VIC Department of Sustainability and Environment
local.contributor.affiliationGill, A Malcom, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationJames, Stewart, Parks Australia
local.contributor.affiliationKay, Geoff, Parks Australia
local.contributor.affiliationKeith, David A., NSW Department of Environment and Climate Change
local.contributor.affiliationMacGregor, Chris, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRussell-Smith, Jeremy, Bushfires Northern Territory
local.contributor.affiliationSalt, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWatson, James E.M., University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationWilliams, Richard J, CSIRO Division of Sustainable Ecosystems
local.contributor.affiliationYork, Alan, University of Melbourne
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1928
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1939
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biocon.2010.05.026
local.identifier.absseo961004 - Natural Hazards in Forest and Woodlands Environments
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:51:31Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77955097169
local.identifier.thomsonID000281125400002
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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