Skip navigation
Skip navigation

How do weaponless male fiddler crabs avoid aggression?

Booksmythe, Isobel; Milner, Richard; Jennions, Michael; Backwell, Patricia

Description

Mimicry of females enables weaker males in many species to avoid intrasexual aggression. In fiddler crabs (Uca annulipes), males use their major claw in aggressive interactions to acquire and defend a territory. Males that have autotomised their major claw will be disadvantaged in fighting, but might use their temporary resemblance to females to avoid costly aggressive encounters with other males. We investigated whether: (1) courting males mistake clawless male fiddler crabs for females; (2)...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBooksmythe, Isobel
dc.contributor.authorMilner, Richard
dc.contributor.authorJennions, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBackwell, Patricia
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:54:42Z
dc.identifier.issn0340-5443
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/59756
dc.description.abstractMimicry of females enables weaker males in many species to avoid intrasexual aggression. In fiddler crabs (Uca annulipes), males use their major claw in aggressive interactions to acquire and defend a territory. Males that have autotomised their major claw will be disadvantaged in fighting, but might use their temporary resemblance to females to avoid costly aggressive encounters with other males. We investigated whether: (1) courting males mistake clawless male fiddler crabs for females; (2) clawless males are able to acquire, defend and retain territories as successfully as intact males; and (3) clawless males are more cautious than intact males. Clawless and intact males differed in burrow acquisition methods and fighting behaviour, but were equally successful at acquiring and retaining burrows. While courting males treated clawless males as female, we found no evidence that clawless males mimic the behaviour of females, or that they exploit the advantage of their mistaken identity. Clawless males further appear to avoid male aggression by altering their territorial strategies to minimise the potential for conflict.
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.sourceBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
dc.subjectKeywords: aggression; behavioral response; courtship; crab; defense mechanism; intrasexual interaction; mimicry; territoriality; Decapoda (Crustacea); Ocypodidae; Uca annulipes Autotomy; Female mimicry; Fiddler crab; Territory acquisition; Territory defence
dc.titleHow do weaponless male fiddler crabs avoid aggression?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume64
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor060201 - Behavioural Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB506
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBooksmythe, Isobel, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMilner, Richard, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationJennions, Michael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBackwell, Patricia, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage485
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage491
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s00265-009-0864-9
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T12:06:24Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-75549087802
local.identifier.thomsonID000274433500018
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Booksmythe_How_do_weaponless_male_fiddler_2010.pdf145.01 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator