Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Cold hardiness of Apteropanorpa tasmanica Carpenter (Mecoptera: Aperopanorpidae)

Palmer, Christopher; Siebke, Katharina

Description

There are very few investigations of cold hardiness in native Australian insects, and no such studies on insects from Tasmania. The Apteropanorpidae is a family of wingless Mecoptera endemic to Tasmania, comprising four described species that can be active in winter. In this study, we used infrared video thermography to investigate the physiological and behavioural responses of Apteropanorpa tasmanica to fast (0.3 °C min-1) and slow (0.03 °C min-1) rates of temperature reduction down to -10 °C....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorSiebke, Katharina
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:53:45Z
dc.identifier.issn0022-1910
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/59479
dc.description.abstractThere are very few investigations of cold hardiness in native Australian insects, and no such studies on insects from Tasmania. The Apteropanorpidae is a family of wingless Mecoptera endemic to Tasmania, comprising four described species that can be active in winter. In this study, we used infrared video thermography to investigate the physiological and behavioural responses of Apteropanorpa tasmanica to fast (0.3 °C min-1) and slow (0.03 °C min-1) rates of temperature reduction down to -10 °C. No adults survived cooling to -10 °C at either cooling rate. Mean supercooling points (SCPs) from fast cooling were -7.0 and -4.6 °C in 2002 and 2003, respectively. Ice nucleation always began in the abdomen, however, the position of nucleation within the abdomen varied between individuals. There was no relationship between SCP and body length, and no significant difference in SCPs between males and females. Stress-induced fast walking began when insects reached approximately -1.5 °C. Cooling rate did not affect the SCP or the temperature at which the behavioural stress response began. Adults survived for only short periods of time in the supercooled state; however they survived in the laboratory for up to 60 days at 4 °C, indicating their longevity at more favourable temperatures. Members of the Apteropanorpidae are adapted to the relatively warm, maritime climate currently influencing Tasmania.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceJournal of Insect Physiology
dc.subjectKeywords: behavioral response; cold tolerance; cooling; insect; longevity; microhabitat; physiological response; videography; animal; animal behavior; article; Australia; cold; female; insect; male; physiology; temperature sense; thermoregulation; Animals; Behavior Alpine climate; Australia; Behaviour; Chill susceptibility; Cooling rate; Infrared video thermography; Longevity; Microhabitat; Opportunism; Physiology; Scorpionflies; Supercooling point; Tasmania
dc.titleCold hardiness of Apteropanorpa tasmanica Carpenter (Mecoptera: Aperopanorpidae)
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume54
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor060808 - Invertebrate Biology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9204316xPUB492
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPalmer, Christopher, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSiebke, Katharina, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1148
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1156
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jinsphys.2008.04.016
dc.date.updated2015-12-10T07:36:33Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-48549103036
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Palmer_Cold_hardiness_of_2008.pdf335.23 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator