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Radiation of Extant Cetaceans Driven by Restructuring of the Oceans

Steeman, Mette E.; Hebsgaard, Martin B.; Fordyce, R. Ewan; Ho, Simon; Rabosky, Daniel L.; Nielsen, Rasmus; Rahbek, Carsten; Glenner, Henrik; Sorensen, Martin V.; Willerslev, Eske

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The remarkable fossil record of whales and dolphins (Cetacea) has made them an exemplar of macroevolution. Although their overall adaptive transition from terrestrial to fully aquatic organisms is well known, this is not true for the radiation of modern whales. Here, we explore the diversification of extant cetaceans by constructing a robust molecular phylogeny that includes 87 of 89 extant species. The phylogeny and divergence times are derived from nuclear and mitochondrial markers,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSteeman, Mette E.
dc.contributor.authorHebsgaard, Martin B.
dc.contributor.authorFordyce, R. Ewan
dc.contributor.authorHo, Simon
dc.contributor.authorRabosky, Daniel L.
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, Rasmus
dc.contributor.authorRahbek, Carsten
dc.contributor.authorGlenner, Henrik
dc.contributor.authorSorensen, Martin V.
dc.contributor.authorWillerslev, Eske
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:53:33Z
dc.identifier.issn1063-5157
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/59401
dc.description.abstractThe remarkable fossil record of whales and dolphins (Cetacea) has made them an exemplar of macroevolution. Although their overall adaptive transition from terrestrial to fully aquatic organisms is well known, this is not true for the radiation of modern whales. Here, we explore the diversification of extant cetaceans by constructing a robust molecular phylogeny that includes 87 of 89 extant species. The phylogeny and divergence times are derived from nuclear and mitochondrial markers, calibrated with fossils. We find that the toothed whales are monophyletic, suggesting that echolocation evolved only once early in that lineage some 36-34 Ma. The rorqual family (Balaenopteridae) is restored with the exclusion of the gray whale, suggesting that gulp feeding evolved 18-16 Ma. Delphinida, comprising all living dolphins and porpoises other than the Ganges/Indus dolphins, originated about 26 Ma; it contains the taxonomically rich delphinids, which began diversifying less than 11 Ma. We tested 2 hypothesized drivers of the extant cetacean radiation by assessing the tempo of lineage accumulation through time. We find no support for a rapid burst of speciation early in the history of extant whales, contrasting with expectations of an adaptive radiation model. However, we do find support for increased diversification rates during periods of pronounced physical restructuring of the oceans. The results imply that paleogeographic and paleoceanographic changes, such as closure of major seaways, have influenced the dynamics of radiation in extant cetaceans.
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceSystematic Biology
dc.subjectKeywords: animal; article; Bayes theorem; biology; Cetacea; echolocation; environment; feeding behavior; fossil; genetics; molecular evolution; nucleotide sequence; phylogeny; physiology; sea; sequence alignment; species differentiation; statistical model; Animals; Cetacea; Evolution; Molecular phylogeny; Palaeo-ocean restructuring; Speciation
dc.titleRadiation of Extant Cetaceans Driven by Restructuring of the Oceans
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume58
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor060309 - Phylogeny and Comparative Analysis
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB488
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSteeman, Mette E., Natural History Museum of Denmark
local.contributor.affiliationHebsgaard, Martin B., Natural History Museum of Denmark
local.contributor.affiliationFordyce, R. Ewan, University of Otago
local.contributor.affiliationHo, Simon, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRabosky, Daniel L., Cornell University
local.contributor.affiliationNielsen, Rasmus, University of California
local.contributor.affiliationRahbek, Carsten, University of Copenhagen
local.contributor.affiliationGlenner, Henrik, Natural History Museum of Denmark
local.contributor.affiliationSorensen, Martin V., Natural History Museum of Denmark
local.contributor.affiliationWillerslev, Eske, University of Copenhagen
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage573
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage585
local.identifier.doi10.1093/sysbio/syp060
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T12:06:12Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-72949086467
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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