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Implications of long-distance flavonoid movement in Arabidopsis thaliana

Buer, Charles; Muday, Gloria K; Djordjevic, Michael

Description

Flavonoid synthesis is modulated by developmental and environmental signals that control the amounts and localization of the diverse flavonoids found in plants. Flavonoids are implicated in regulating a number of physiological processes including UV protection, fertilization, auxin transport, plant architecture, gravitropism and pathogenic and symbiotic interactions with other organisms. Recendy we showed that flavonoids can move long distances in plants, which may facilitate these molecules...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBuer, Charles
dc.contributor.authorMuday, Gloria K
dc.contributor.authorDjordjevic, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:44:11Z
dc.date.available2015-12-10T22:44:11Z
dc.identifier.issn1559-2316
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/58492
dc.description.abstractFlavonoid synthesis is modulated by developmental and environmental signals that control the amounts and localization of the diverse flavonoids found in plants. Flavonoids are implicated in regulating a number of physiological processes including UV protection, fertilization, auxin transport, plant architecture, gravitropism and pathogenic and symbiotic interactions with other organisms. Recendy we showed that flavonoids can move long distances in plants, which may facilitate these molecules reaching positions in the plant where these processes are regulated. The localised application of selective flavonoids to tt4 mutants such as naringenin, dihydrokaempferol and dihydroquercetin showed that they were taken up at the root tip, mid-root or cotyledons and travelled long distances via cell-to-cell movement to distal tissues and converted to quercetin and kaempferol. In contrast, kaempferol and quercetin do not move long distances. They were taken up only at the root tip and did not move from this position. Here we show the movement of endogenous flavonoids by using reciprocal grafting experiments between tt4 and wild-type seedlings. These results demonstrated that to understand the distribution of flavonoids in Arabidopsis, it is necessary to know where the flavonoid biosynthetic enzymes are made and to understand the mechanisms by which certain flavonoids move from their site of synthesis.
dc.publisherLandes Bioscience
dc.sourcePlant Signaling & Behavior
dc.subjectKeywords: Arabidopsis; Arabidopsis thaliana Aglycone; Arabidopsis thaliana; Flavonoid movement; Fluorescence; Kaempferol; Quercetin; Reciprocal graft
dc.titleImplications of long-distance flavonoid movement in Arabidopsis thaliana
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume3
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor060705 - Plant Physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9204316xPUB444
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBuer, Charles, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMuday, Gloria K, Wake Forest University
local.contributor.affiliationDjordjevic, Michael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage415
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage417
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T11:20:23Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-44649179196
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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