Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Emissions of methane and nitrous oxide from Australian sugarcane soils

Denmead, O Thomas; MacDonald, Bennett; Bryant, G; Naylor, T; Wilson, Stephen; Griffith, D W T; Wang, Wiejin; Salter, B; White, Ian; Moody, Philip

Description

Climatic conditions and cultural practices in the sub-tropical and tropical high-rainfall regions in which sugarcane is grown in Australia are conducive to rapid carbon and nitrogen cycling. Previous research has identified substantial exchanges of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) between sugarcane soils and the atmosphere. However, that research has been mostly short-term. This paper describes recent work aimed at quantifying exchanges of CH4 and N2O from fertilised sugarcane soils over...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDenmead, O Thomas
dc.contributor.authorMacDonald, Bennett
dc.contributor.authorBryant, G
dc.contributor.authorNaylor, T
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorGriffith, D W T
dc.contributor.authorWang, Wiejin
dc.contributor.authorSalter, B
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Ian
dc.contributor.authorMoody, Philip
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:43:35Z
dc.identifier.issn0168-1923
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/58230
dc.description.abstractClimatic conditions and cultural practices in the sub-tropical and tropical high-rainfall regions in which sugarcane is grown in Australia are conducive to rapid carbon and nitrogen cycling. Previous research has identified substantial exchanges of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) between sugarcane soils and the atmosphere. However, that research has been mostly short-term. This paper describes recent work aimed at quantifying exchanges of CH4 and N2O from fertilised sugarcane soils over whole growing seasons. Micrometeorological and chamber techniques provided continuous measurements of gas emissions in whole-of-season studies in a burnt-cane crop on an acid sulfate soil (ASS) that was fertilised with 160kg nitrogen (N)ha-1 as urea in the south of the sugarcane belt (Site 1), and in a crop on a more representative trash-blanketed soil fertilised with 150kg urea-Nha-1 in the north (Site 2). Site 1 was a strong source of CH4 with a seasonal emission (over 342 days) of 19.9kg CH4ha-1. That rate corresponds to 0.5-5% of those expected from rice and wetlands. The many drains in the region appear to be the main source. The net annual emission of CH4 at Site 2 over 292 days was essentially zero, which contradicts predictions that trash-blankets on the soil are net CH4 sinks. Emissions of N2O from the ASS at Site 1 were extraordinarily large and prolonged, totalling 72.1kgN2Oha-1 (45.9kgNha-1) and persisting at substantial rates for 5 months. The high porosity and frequent wetting with consequent high water filled pore space and the high carbon content of the soil appear to be important drivers of N2O production. At Site 2, emissions were much smaller, totalling 7.4kgN2Oha-1 (4.7kgNha-1), most of which was emitted in less than 3 months. The emission factors for N2O (the proportion of fertiliser nitrogen emitted as N2O-N) were 21% at Site 1 and 2.8% at Site 2. Both factors exceed the default national inventory value of 1.25%. Calculations suggest that annual N2O production from Australian sugarcane soils is around 3.8ktN2O, which is about one-half a previous estimate based on short-term measurements, and although ASS constitute only about 4% of Australia's sugarcane soils, they could contribute about 25% of soil emissions of N2O from sugarcane. The uptake of 50-94tCO2ha-1 from the atmosphere by the crops at both sites was offset by emissions of CH4 and N2O to the atmosphere amounting to 22tCO2-eha-1 at Site 1 and 2tCO2-eha-1 at Site 2.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceAgricultural and Forest Meteorology
dc.subjectKeywords: acid soil; agricultural emission; carbon cycle; climate conditions; FTIR spectroscopy; growing season; methane; micrometeorology; nitrogen cycle; nitrogen oxides; sugar cane; Australia Acid sulfate soils; Automatic chambers; Flux-gradient techniques; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
dc.titleEmissions of methane and nitrous oxide from Australian sugarcane soils
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolumeonline
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor050304 - Soil Chemistry (excl. Carbon Sequestration Science)
local.identifier.ariespublicationU4279067xPUB433
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDenmead, O Thomas, CSIRO Land and Water
local.contributor.affiliationMacDonald, Bennett, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBryant, G, University of Wollongong
local.contributor.affiliationNaylor, T, University of Wollongong
local.contributor.affiliationWilson, Stephen, University of Wollongong
local.contributor.affiliationGriffith, D W T, University of Wollongong
local.contributor.affiliationWang, Wiejin, QLD Department of Natural Resources and Mines
local.contributor.affiliationSalter, B, BSES Ltd
local.contributor.affiliationWhite, Ian, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMoody, Philip, QLD Department of Natural Resources and Mines
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issueonline 29 Jul 09
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage9
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.agrformet.2009.06.018
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:51:11Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77954143294
local.identifier.thomsonID000280076400002
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Denmead_Emissions_of_methane_and_2010.pdf823.15 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  20 July 2017/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator