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Race to the Bottom: The Soccer Ball Industry in China, Pakistan and India

Chan, Anita; Xue, Hong; Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Nadvi, Khalid; Khara, Navjote

Description

An antisweatshop movement emerged in the early 1990s, exposing very low wages and poor working conditions in the factories in the world's South that manufacture for big brand-name companies in the global North, which drew up corporate codes of conduct and promised to rein in their suppliers. To ensure that their suppliers complied with the corporate codes, they turned to an elaborate monitoring system, and a new industry of monitoring firms offering factory-inspection services flourished in the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorChan, Anita
dc.contributor.authorXue, Hong
dc.contributor.authorLund-Thomsen, Peter
dc.contributor.authorNadvi, Khalid
dc.contributor.authorKhara, Navjote
dc.contributor.editorAnita Chan
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:40:50Z
dc.identifier.isbn9780801453496
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/57622
dc.description.abstractAn antisweatshop movement emerged in the early 1990s, exposing very low wages and poor working conditions in the factories in the world's South that manufacture for big brand-name companies in the global North, which drew up corporate codes of conduct and promised to rein in their suppliers. To ensure that their suppliers complied with the corporate codes, they turned to an elaborate monitoring system, and a new industry of monitoring firms offering factory-inspection services flourished in the global South. There emerged the concept of 'supply chain governance' and a subdiscipline in academia devoted to studying this buyer-supplier relationship, the succes and failure of the monitoring system, and the labour conditions of the workers who make the products within the chains. Has this 'corporate social responsibility' (CSR) monitoring, however, improved labor standards for the supply-chain workers?
dc.publisherCornell University Press
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Workers in Comparative Perspective
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.titleRace to the Bottom: The Soccer Ball Industry in China, Pakistan and India
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor160606 - Government and Politics of Asia and the Pacific
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5530201xPUB408
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationChan, Anita, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationXue, Hong, East China Normal University
local.contributor.affiliationLund-Thomsen, Peter, Copenhagen Business School
local.contributor.affiliationNadvi, Khalid, University of Manchester
local.contributor.affiliationKhara, Navjote, Niagra College
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage132
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage154
local.identifier.doi10.7591/9780801455865-009
dc.date.updated2020-11-22T07:45:45Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationIthaca
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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