Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Antipredator vigilance in cooperatively breeding superb fairy-wrens ( Malurus cyaneus )

Yasukawa, Ken; Cockburn, Andrew

Description

We studied 19 color-banded groups of the cooperatively breeding Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) to determine (1) the contributions of breeding and helper males to antipredator vigilance, (2) whether such vigilance reduces predation risk, and (3) the mechanisms by which it might do so. Time spent as a sentinel (perching and scanning from conspicuous locations within sight of the nest) increased with group size, but successful and depredated nests did not differ significantly in sentinel...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorYasukawa, Ken
dc.contributor.authorCockburn, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:39:45Z
dc.identifier.issn0004-8038
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/57320
dc.description.abstractWe studied 19 color-banded groups of the cooperatively breeding Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) to determine (1) the contributions of breeding and helper males to antipredator vigilance, (2) whether such vigilance reduces predation risk, and (3) the mechanisms by which it might do so. Time spent as a sentinel (perching and scanning from conspicuous locations within sight of the nest) increased with group size, but successful and depredated nests did not differ significantly in sentinel time, and sentinels did not appear to coordinate their vigilance. Both breeder and helper males acted as sentinels, and both were more vigilant when nests contained nestlings than when they contained eggs. Breeders with helpers spent more time as sentinels than those without helpers. Presence of a sentinel reduced the time feeding adults spent pausing to scan when approaching and leaving the nest. Thus, vigilance could enable a male to detect a predator and decoy it away from the nest site or prevent it from locating the nest by deferring feeding visits of other provisioners, but we could not demonstrate that it reduced nest predation by the major nest predator, the Pied Currawong (Strepera graculina).
dc.publisherAmerican Ornithologists Union
dc.sourceAuk
dc.subjectKeywords: antipredator defense; cooperative breeding; group size; passerine; predation risk; predator-prey interaction; vigilance; Malurus cyaneus; Strepera graculina; Troglodytinae Antipredator behavior; Cooperative breeding; Malurus cyaneus; Parental behavior; Superb Fairy-wren
dc.titleAntipredator vigilance in cooperatively breeding superb fairy-wrens ( Malurus cyaneus )
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume126
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor060803 - Animal Developmental and Reproductive Biology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB395
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationYasukawa, Ken, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCockburn, Andrew, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage147
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage154
local.identifier.doi10.1525/auk.2009.08074
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T12:04:54Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-67650493911
local.identifier.thomsonID000263488700015
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Yasukawa_Antipredator_vigilance_in_2009.pdf204.73 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator