Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Women with bulimic eating disorders: When do they receive treatment for an eating problem?

Mond, Jonathon M; Hay, Phillipa J.; Darby , Anita; Paxton, Susan; Quirk, F.; Buttner, P.; Owen, Cathy; Rodgers, Bryan

Description

Variables associated with the use of health services were examined in a prospective, community-based study of women with bulimic-type eating disorders who did (n = 33) or did not (n = 58) receive treatment for an eating problem during a 12-month follow-up period. Participants who received treatment for an eating problem differed from those who did not in several respects, including higher body weight, higher levels of eating disorder psychopathology, general psychological distress, and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMond, Jonathon M
dc.contributor.authorHay, Phillipa J.
dc.contributor.authorDarby , Anita
dc.contributor.authorPaxton, Susan
dc.contributor.authorQuirk, F.
dc.contributor.authorButtner, P.
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Cathy
dc.contributor.authorRodgers, Bryan
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:39:07Z
dc.identifier.issn0022-006X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/57029
dc.description.abstractVariables associated with the use of health services were examined in a prospective, community-based study of women with bulimic-type eating disorders who did (n = 33) or did not (n = 58) receive treatment for an eating problem during a 12-month follow-up period. Participants who received treatment for an eating problem differed from those who did not in several respects, including higher body weight, higher levels of eating disorder psychopathology, general psychological distress, and impairment in role functioning, deficits in specific aspects of coping style, greater awareness of an eating problem, and greater likelihood of prior treatment for a problem with weight. However, the variables most strongly associated with treatment seeking were greater perceived impairment in role functioning specifically associated with an eating problem and greater perceived inability to suppress emotional difficulties. These were the only variables that were significantly associated with treatment seeking in multivariable analysis. The findings suggest that individuals' recognition of the adverse effects of eating-disordered behavior on quality of life may need to be addressed in prevention and early intervention programs for eating disorders.
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association
dc.sourceJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
dc.subjectKeywords: adult; article; body weight; bulimia; clinical trial; controlled study; distress syndrome; female; health care personnel; health service; help seeking behavior; human; major clinical study; psychotherapy; Adaptation, Psychological; Adult; Australian Capit binge eating disorder; bulimia nervosa; eating disorders; health service utilization; prevention
dc.titleWomen with bulimic eating disorders: When do they receive treatment for an eating problem?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume77
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor111708 - Health and Community Services
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9406909xPUB384
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMond, Jonathon M, La Trobe University
local.contributor.affiliationHay, Phillipa J., University of Western Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationDarby , Anita, James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationPaxton, Susan, La Trobe University
local.contributor.affiliationQuirk, F., James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationButtner, P., James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationOwen, Cathy, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRodgers, Bryan, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage835
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage844
local.identifier.doi10.1037/a0015336
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T11:58:57Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-70350451567
local.identifier.thomsonID000270564400004
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Mond_Women_with_bulimic_eating_2009.pdf87.03 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator