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Trauma in resettled iraqi refugees: Differences between those seeking psychological treatment and those not seeking psychological treatment

Slewa-Younan, Shameran; Radulovic, Monika; Lujic , Sanja; Hasan, Tamsin; Raphael, Beverley

Description

Psychological distress experienced by resettling refugees has been well documented, with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression being prevalent outcomes. This study examined psychological and physiological measures of trauma exposure in 2 groups of Iraqi refugees resettled in Australia, those seeking psychological treatment (n = 25) versus those not seeking treatment (n = 22). Data from a group of healthy sex- and age-matched controls (n = 32) were collected to facilitate norm...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSlewa-Younan, Shameran
dc.contributor.authorRadulovic, Monika
dc.contributor.authorLujic , Sanja
dc.contributor.authorHasan, Tamsin
dc.contributor.authorRaphael, Beverley
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:38:55Z
dc.identifier.issn1092-6771
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/56941
dc.description.abstractPsychological distress experienced by resettling refugees has been well documented, with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression being prevalent outcomes. This study examined psychological and physiological measures of trauma exposure in 2 groups of Iraqi refugees resettled in Australia, those seeking psychological treatment (n = 25) versus those not seeking treatment (n = 22). Data from a group of healthy sex- and age-matched controls (n = 32) were collected to facilitate norm comparisons for physiological arousal. Continuous recording of electrocardiogram data examined resting heart rate (HR). Refugees seeking treatment had significantly higher levels of PTSD symptomology and depression levels compared to non-treatment-seeking refugees; however, there was no difference in the number of trauma events endorsed. Finally, resting HR was significantly higher in both refugee groups compared with healthy controls; however, there was no difference between the refugee groups. Clinical consideration of this excessive trauma exposure and elevated autonomic arousal is warranted.
dc.publisherThe Haworth Maltreatment & Trauma Press
dc.sourceJournal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma
dc.titleTrauma in resettled iraqi refugees: Differences between those seeking psychological treatment and those not seeking psychological treatment
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume23
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor110319 - Psychiatry (incl. Psychotherapy)
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB381
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSlewa-Younan, Shameran, University of Western Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationRadulovic, Monika, School of Medicine, The University of Western Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationLujic , Sanja, University of Western Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationHasan, Tamsin, The University of Western Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationRaphael, Beverley, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue9
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage917
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage929
local.identifier.doi10.1080/10926771.2014.955897
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T10:45:38Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84920105085
local.identifier.thomsonID000350131500003
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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