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Characterisation of a blowfly male-specific neuron using behaviourally generated visual stimuli

Trischler, Christine; Boeddeker, Norbert; Egelhaaf, Martin

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The pursuit system controlling chasing behaviour in male blowflies has to cope with extremely fast and dynamically changing visual input. An identified male-specific visual neuron called Male Lobula Giant 1 (MLG1) is presumably one major element of this pursuit system. Previous behavioural and modelling analyses have indicated that angular target size, retinal target position and target velocity are relevant input variables of the pursuit system. To investigate whether MLG1 specifically...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorTrischler, Christine
dc.contributor.authorBoeddeker, Norbert
dc.contributor.authorEgelhaaf, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:35:33Z
dc.identifier.issn0340-7594
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/56312
dc.description.abstractThe pursuit system controlling chasing behaviour in male blowflies has to cope with extremely fast and dynamically changing visual input. An identified male-specific visual neuron called Male Lobula Giant 1 (MLG1) is presumably one major element of this pursuit system. Previous behavioural and modelling analyses have indicated that angular target size, retinal target position and target velocity are relevant input variables of the pursuit system. To investigate whether MLG1 specifically represents any of these visual parameters we obtained in vivo intracellular recordings while replaying optical stimuli that simulate the visual signals received by a male fly during chasing manoeuvres. On the basis of these naturalistic stimuli we find that MLG1 shows distinct direction sensitivity and is depolarised if the target motion contains an upward component. The responses of MLG1 are jointly determined by the retinal position, the speed and direction, and the duration of target motimotion. Coherence analysis reveals that although retinal target size and position are in some way inherent in the responses of MLG1, we find no confirmation of the hypothesis that MLG1 encodes any of these parameters exclusively.
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.sourceJournal of Comparative Physiology A: Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
dc.subjectKeywords: animal; article; electrophysiology; fly; male; nerve cell; photostimulation; physiology; sensory nerve cell; sexual behavior; time; Animals; Diptera; Electrophysiology; Male; Neurons; Neurons, Afferent; Photic Stimulation; Sexual Behavior, Animal; Time Fa Chasing behaviour; Fly; Male-specific neuron; Naturalistic stimuli; Vision
dc.titleCharacterisation of a blowfly male-specific neuron using behaviourally generated visual stimuli
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume193
dc.date.issued2007
local.identifier.absfor110906 - Sensory Systems
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9204316xPUB358
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationTrischler, Christine, Bielefeld University
local.contributor.affiliationBoeddeker, Norbert, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationEgelhaaf, Martin, Bielefeld University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage559
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage572
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s00359-007-0212-3
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T10:28:36Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-34249807334
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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