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Commensalistic institutions and value conflicts: the World Trade Organization and global private food standards

Botterill, Linda; Daugbjerg, Carsten

Description

An important outcome of the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade negotiations was the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement). This was set up to discipline the use of national food safety and animal and plant health regulations and to prevent their emergence as technical barriers to trade. The Agreement privileges free trade and scientific evidence, thus excluding many ethical considerations from the regulations that national governments can enact in...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBotterill, Linda
dc.contributor.authorDaugbjerg, Carsten
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:31:26Z
dc.identifier.issn1755-7739
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/55522
dc.description.abstractAn important outcome of the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade negotiations was the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement). This was set up to discipline the use of national food safety and animal and plant health regulations and to prevent their emergence as technical barriers to trade. The Agreement privileges free trade and scientific evidence, thus excluding many ethical considerations from the regulations that national governments can enact in relation to production methods in the agri-food chain. Autonomously from the SPS Agreement, a number of global private standard schemes have been developed that have incorporated values rejected by the SPS Agreement. This paper examines the relationship between the Agreement and the private standards and argues that this case highlights a gap in the institutional literature with respect to parallel institutions emerging autonomously from the primary institution to embody values excluded by the latter. We adopt the term commensalism for these previously undescribed relationships.
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.sourceEuropean Political Science Review
dc.titleCommensalistic institutions and value conflicts: the World Trade Organization and global private food standards
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume7
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor140210 - International Economics and International Finance
local.identifier.absfor160510 - Public Policy
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4430637xPUB331
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBotterill, Linda, University of Canberra
local.contributor.affiliationDaugbjerg, Carsten, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage23
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage42
local.identifier.doi10.1017/S1755773913000295
dc.date.updated2020-12-27T07:31:33Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84994323857
local.identifier.thomsonID000347302400003
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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