Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Amorphization and graphitization of single-crystal diamond - A transmission electron microscopy study

Hickey, D P; Jones, K S; Elliman, Robert

Description

The amorphization and graphitization of single-crystal diamond by ion implantation were explored using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of ion implantation and annealing on the microstructure was studied in (100) diamond substrates Si+ implanted at 1 MeV. At a dose of 1 × 1015 cm- 2, implants done at 77 K showed a damage layer that evolves into amorphous pockets upon annealing at 1350 °C for 24 h whereas room temperature implants (303 K) recovered to the original defect free...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHickey, D P
dc.contributor.authorJones, K S
dc.contributor.authorElliman, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:31:03Z
dc.identifier.issn0925-9635
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/55362
dc.description.abstractThe amorphization and graphitization of single-crystal diamond by ion implantation were explored using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of ion implantation and annealing on the microstructure was studied in (100) diamond substrates Si+ implanted at 1 MeV. At a dose of 1 × 1015 cm- 2, implants done at 77 K showed a damage layer that evolves into amorphous pockets upon annealing at 1350 °C for 24 h whereas room temperature implants (303 K) recovered to the original defect free state upon annealing. Increasing the dose to 7 × 1015 Si+/cm2 at 303 K created an amorphous-carbon layer 570 ± 20 nm thick. Using a buried marker layer, it was possible to determine that the swelling associated with the amorphization process was 150 nm. From this it was calculated that the layer while obviously less dense than crystalline diamond was still 15% more dense than graphite. Electron diffraction is consistent with the as-implanted structure consisting of amorphous carbon. Upon annealing, further swelling occurs, and full graphitization is achieved between 1 and 24 h at 1350 °C as determined by both the density and electron diffraction analysis. No solid phase epitaxial recrystallization of diamond is observed. The graphite showed a preferred crystal orientation with the (002)g//(022)d. Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations suggests the critical displacement threshold for amorphization of diamond is approximately 6 ± 2 × 1022 vacancies/cm3.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceDiamond and Related Materials
dc.subjectKeywords: Amorphization process; Amorphous pocket; Buried marker-layers; Carbon layers; Critical displacement; Defect free state; Diamond substrates; Electron diffraction analysis; Monte Carlo Simulation; Room-temperature implants; Single crystal diamond; Solid pha Amorphization; Diamond; Graphitization; Ion-implantation; Single crystal diamond; Transmission electron microscopy (TEM)
dc.titleAmorphization and graphitization of single-crystal diamond - A transmission electron microscopy study
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume18
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor040306 - Mineralogy and Crystallography
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4222028xPUB326
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHickey, D P , University of Florida
local.contributor.affiliationJones, K S , University of Florida
local.contributor.affiliationElliman, Robert, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue11
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1353
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1359
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.diamond.2009.08.012
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:46:14Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-71849098398
local.identifier.thomsonID000271257100005
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Hickey_Amorphization_and_2009.pdf1.61 MBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator