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A 4000 year-old introduction of domestic pigs into the Philippine Archipelago: implications for understanding routes of human migration through Island Southeast Asia and Wallacea

Piper, Philip; Hung, Hsiao-chun; Campos, Fredeliza Z; Bellwood, Peter; Santiago, Rey

Description

New research into the Neolithic of Island Southeast Asia is broadening the old models and making them more diverse, more human - more like history: people and animals can move through the islands in a multitude of ways. The domestic pig is an important tracker of Neolithic people and practice into the Pacific, and the authors address the controversial matter of whether domestic pigs first reached the islands of Southeast Asia from China via Taiwan or from the neighbouring Vietnamese peninsula....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPiper, Philip
dc.contributor.authorHung, Hsiao-chun
dc.contributor.authorCampos, Fredeliza Z
dc.contributor.authorBellwood, Peter
dc.contributor.authorSantiago, Rey
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:25:48Z
dc.identifier.issn0003-598X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/53642
dc.description.abstractNew research into the Neolithic of Island Southeast Asia is broadening the old models and making them more diverse, more human - more like history: people and animals can move through the islands in a multitude of ways. The domestic pig is an important tracker of Neolithic people and practice into the Pacific, and the authors address the controversial matter of whether domestic pigs first reached the islands of Southeast Asia from China via Taiwan or from the neighbouring Vietnamese peninsula. The DNA trajectory read from modern pigs favours Vietnam, but the authors have found well stratified domestic pig in the Philippines dated to c. 4000 BP and associated with cultural material of Taiwan. Thus the perils of relying only on DNA - but are these alternative or additional stories?.
dc.publisherAntiquity Publications
dc.sourceAntiquity
dc.subjectKeywords: Human migration; Neolithic; Philippines; Pig domestication
dc.titleA 4000 year-old introduction of domestic pigs into the Philippine Archipelago: implications for understanding routes of human migration through Island Southeast Asia and Wallacea
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume83
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor210103 - Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Americas
local.identifier.absfor160303 - Migration
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3923986xPUB279
local.identifier.ariespublicationu8304786xPUB294
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPiper, Philip, University of the Philippines
local.contributor.affiliationHung, Hsiao-chun, Academia Sinica
local.contributor.affiliationCampos, Fredeliza Z, University of the Philippines
local.contributor.affiliationBellwood, Peter, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSantiago, Rey, National Museum of the Philippines
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage687
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage695
local.identifier.doi10.1017/S0003598X00098914
local.identifier.absseo970121 - Expanding Knowledge in History and Archaeology
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:20:41Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77949818125
local.identifier.thomsonID000269867900008
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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