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Nurturing regulatory compliance: Is procedural justice effective when people question the legitimacy of the law?

Murphy, Kristina; Tyler, Tom R.; Curtis, Amy

Description

Procedural justice generally enhances an authority's legitimacy and encourages people to comply with an authority's decisions and rules. We argue, however, that previous research on procedural justice and legitimacy has examined legitimacy in a limited way by focusing solely on the perceived legitimacy of authorities and ignoring how people may perceive the legitimacy of the laws and rules they enforce. In addition, no research to date has examined how such perceptions of legitimacy may...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Kristina
dc.contributor.authorTyler, Tom R.
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Amy
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:25:34Z
dc.identifier.issn1748-5983
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/53540
dc.description.abstractProcedural justice generally enhances an authority's legitimacy and encourages people to comply with an authority's decisions and rules. We argue, however, that previous research on procedural justice and legitimacy has examined legitimacy in a limited way by focusing solely on the perceived legitimacy of authorities and ignoring how people may perceive the legitimacy of the laws and rules they enforce. In addition, no research to date has examined how such perceptions of legitimacy may moderate the effect of procedural justice on compliance behavior. Using survey data collected across three different regulatory contexts - taxation (Study 1), social security (Study 2), and law enforcement (Study 3) - the findings suggest that one's perceptions of the legitimacy of the law moderates the effect of procedural justice on compliance behaviors; procedural justice is more important for shaping compliance behaviors when people question the legitimacy of the laws than when they accept them as legitimate. An explanation of these findings using a social distancing framework is offered, along with a discussion of the implications the findings have on enforcement.
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.sourceRegulation & Governance
dc.subjectKeywords: Compliance; Legitimacy; Motivational postures; Procedural justice; Regulation
dc.titleNurturing regulatory compliance: Is procedural justice effective when people question the legitimacy of the law?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume3
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor180119 - Law and Society
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4326120xPUB276
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMurphy, Kristina, Deakin University
local.contributor.affiliationTyler, Tom R., New York University
local.contributor.affiliationCurtis, Amy, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage26
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1748-5991.2009.01043.x
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:55:53Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-64849083523
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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