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Obstetric management of the next pregnancy after an unexplained stillbirth: An anonymous postal survey of Australian obstetricians

Robson, Stephen; Thompson, Jane; Ellwood, David

Description

Background: Women who have an unexplained stillbirth are more likely to be delivered early, by induced labour or Caesarean section, in their next pregnancy. It is unclear whether these birth outcomes result from characteristics of the next pregnancy, or represent management strategies of obstetricians. Aim: To investigate obstetricians' management strategies in the next pregnancy after an unexplained stillbirth. Methods: Anonymous postal survey of Australian obstetricians. Respondents were...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorRobson, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Jane
dc.contributor.authorEllwood, David
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:22:00Z
dc.identifier.issn0004-8666
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/52461
dc.description.abstractBackground: Women who have an unexplained stillbirth are more likely to be delivered early, by induced labour or Caesarean section, in their next pregnancy. It is unclear whether these birth outcomes result from characteristics of the next pregnancy, or represent management strategies of obstetricians. Aim: To investigate obstetricians' management strategies in the next pregnancy after an unexplained stillbirth. Methods: Anonymous postal survey of Australian obstetricians. Respondents were given a clinical scenario regarding a previous unexplained stillbirth and were asked about management. Results: The response rate was 69%. Tests of 'fetal well-being' were undertaken by the majority of respondents. Additional third trimester ultrasound surveillance was recommended by 87% of respondents, regular cardiotograph monitoring by 72% and formal fetal movement charting by 39%. Elective induction of labour (in the absence of any other obstetric indication) was recommended by 93% of respondents, and elective Caesarean delivery by 35%. Conclusions: The tendency for subsequent pregnancies after an unexplained stillbirth to be delivered earlier, and more often by Caesarean section, may be due in part to altered management strategies, not solely as a result of complications of the pregnancy itself.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
dc.subjectKeywords: article; Australia; cardiotocography; cesarean section; clinical practice; controlled study; echography; geographic distribution; gestation period; health survey; human; labor induction; obstetrics; patient counseling; population distribution; practice gu Caesarean section; Cardiotocograph; Fetal movements; Non-stress test; Unexplained stillbirth
dc.titleObstetric management of the next pregnancy after an unexplained stillbirth: An anonymous postal survey of Australian obstetricians
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume46
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor111402 - Obstetrics and Gynaecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4133361xPUB247
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationRobson, Stephen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationThompson, Jane, Canberra Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationEllwood, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage278
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage281
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1479-828X.2006.00591.x
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T08:59:24Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33745618485
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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