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Attachment insecurities and identification of at-risk individuals following the death of a loved one

Jerga, Angelique; Shaver, Phillip R; Wilkinson, Ross

Description

We examined variables that might identify at-risk individuals following the death of a significant other. Previous research indicates attachment anxiety is associated with more intense grief, while avoidant individuals seem to cope with loss as well as secure individuals. Participants in this study (368 adults aged 17-49) completed an online survey measuring general and relationship-specific attachment insecurities, relationship characteristics, loss circumstances, and typical and prolonged...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorJerga, Angelique
dc.contributor.authorShaver, Phillip R
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Ross
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:14:55Z
dc.identifier.issn0265-4075
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/50379
dc.description.abstractWe examined variables that might identify at-risk individuals following the death of a significant other. Previous research indicates attachment anxiety is associated with more intense grief, while avoidant individuals seem to cope with loss as well as secure individuals. Participants in this study (368 adults aged 17-49) completed an online survey measuring general and relationship-specific attachment insecurities, relationship characteristics, loss circumstances, and typical and prolonged grief symptoms. General attachment anxiety and avoidance were related to prolonged grief symptoms but not to typical symptoms. Relationship-specific anxiety was positively related to grief symptoms, while specific avoidance was negatively related. The results support the distinction between general and specific attachment insecurities and between normative and prolonged grief reactions.
dc.publisherSage Publications Inc
dc.sourceJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
dc.subjectKeywords: adjustment; attachment; bereavement; coping; death; grief; loss; prolonged grief
dc.titleAttachment insecurities and identification of at-risk individuals following the death of a loved one
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume28
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor170106 - Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9312950xPUB202
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationJerga, Angelique, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationShaver, Phillip R, University of California
local.contributor.affiliationWilkinson, Ross, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue7
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage891
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage914
local.identifier.doi10.1177/0265407510397987
local.identifier.absseo970117 - Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T11:58:26Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-80455137149
local.identifier.thomsonID000296633400001
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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