Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Representation and suspicion in Canada's appearance under the Universal Periodic Review

Authers, Benjamin

Description

Introduction In an acerbic concluding comment on Canada�s first appearance under the Universal Periodic Review (UPR), the Cuban delegation reflected on what it saw as the decline of Canada�s dedication to the global good. Cuba indicated that it �missed� Canada�s former �pro-third-world approach� and a national stance that was �always on the side of the weakest�. It also lamented that Canada no longer held its former commitment �to the noblest causes�. Given the circumstances in which they were...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorAuthers, Benjamin
dc.contributor.editorEmma Larking
dc.contributor.editorHilary Charlesworth
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:14:15Z
dc.identifier.isbn9781107086302
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/50206
dc.description.abstractIntroduction In an acerbic concluding comment on Canada�s first appearance under the Universal Periodic Review (UPR), the Cuban delegation reflected on what it saw as the decline of Canada�s dedication to the global good. Cuba indicated that it �missed� Canada�s former �pro-third-world approach� and a national stance that was �always on the side of the weakest�. It also lamented that Canada no longer held its former commitment �to the noblest causes�. Given the circumstances in which they were made (as a reflection on the UPR and in the UN Human Rights Council), these comments read as an accusation by Cuba that Canada, presented as once having been a champion of social justice and human rights, no longer warrants such a characterisation. The idea that Canada is (or was) a champion of rights has had broad circulation and considerable international currency in the past half-century, currency that has been given further value through Canada�s early involvement in global peace-keeping and the award of the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize to former Canadian Secretary of State for External Affairs (and future Prime Minister) Lester B. Pearson. More recent examples of Canada�s work in promoting human rights ideas can be seen in its sponsorship of the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty, which produced The Responsibility to Protect report (2001), or its role in circulating �non-papers� suggesting new human rights reporting procedures for what ultimately became the Universal Periodic Review.
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Rights And The Universal Periodic Review: Rituals and Ritualism
dc.titleRepresentation and suspicion in Canada's appearance under the Universal Periodic Review
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor180116 - International Law (excl. International Trade Law)
local.identifier.absfor180114 - Human Rights Law
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4860843xPUB199
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationAuthers, Benjamin, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage169
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage186
local.identifier.doi10.1017/CBO9781316091289.013
dc.date.updated2020-12-13T07:28:50Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationCambridge, United Kingdom
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84954287840
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Authers_Representation_and_suspicion_2014.pdf182.92 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator