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The Effect of Attentional Bias Toward Shape- and Weight-Related Information on Body Dissatisfaction

Smith, Evelyn; Rieger, Elizabeth

Description

Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the causal role of selective attention to shape/weight-related information in terms of intensifying body dissatisfaction. Method: The participants were 70 female first-year psychology students aged 17-28 years. An attentional probe task was used to induce attention toward either negative shape/weight-related words, neutral words, or negatively valenced emotion words. Thereafter vulnerability toward the development of body dissatisfaction...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSmith, Evelyn
dc.contributor.authorRieger, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:13:49Z
dc.identifier.issn1098-108X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/49938
dc.description.abstractObjective: The objective of this study was to investigate the causal role of selective attention to shape/weight-related information in terms of intensifying body dissatisfaction. Method: The participants were 70 female first-year psychology students aged 17-28 years. An attentional probe task was used to induce attention toward either negative shape/weight-related words, neutral words, or negatively valenced emotion words. Thereafter vulnerability toward the development of body dissatisfaction was assessed in the three groups after being exposed to a body image challenge. Results: The induction of an attentional bias toward shape/weight-related information resulted in higher body dissatisfaction compared with both control groups. Conclusion: The results support the notion that an attentional bias toward shape/weight-related information plays a causal role in body dissatisfaction, suggesting that such biases may prove to be a useful target in interventions designed to improve body image.
dc.publisherWiley-VCH Verlag GMBH
dc.sourceInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
dc.subjectKeywords: adolescent; adult; article; Australia; body build; body dissatisfaction; body dysmorphic disorder; body image; body weight; controlled study; eating disorder; emotion; female; high risk population; human; human experiment; information service; normal huma Body dissatisfaction; Selective attention; Shape/weight
dc.titleThe Effect of Attentional Bias Toward Shape- and Weight-Related Information on Body Dissatisfaction
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume39
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor170106 - Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9312950xPUB194
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSmith, Evelyn, University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationRieger, Elizabeth, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage509
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage515
local.identifier.doi10.1002/eat.20291
local.identifier.absseo970117 - Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T08:00:07Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33747185610
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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