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The iteration deficit in responsive regulation: Are regulatory ambassadors an answer?

Braithwaite, John; Hong, Seung-Hun

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One reason that regulation is difficult is that repeated encounters between regulator and regulatee are rare. We suggest diplomacy as a model for reconfiguring regulatory institutions in response. Ambassadors for Regulatory Affairs who would be agents for all state regulatory agencies could be based in most large firms and small and medium enterprises that pose unusual regulatory risks. In rural towns, police would be trained as regulatory ambassadors. Just as a US Secretary of State can launch...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBraithwaite, John
dc.contributor.authorHong, Seung-Hun
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T22:12:37Z
dc.identifier.issn1748-5983
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/49748
dc.description.abstractOne reason that regulation is difficult is that repeated encounters between regulator and regulatee are rare. We suggest diplomacy as a model for reconfiguring regulatory institutions in response. Ambassadors for Regulatory Affairs who would be agents for all state regulatory agencies could be based in most large firms and small and medium enterprises that pose unusual regulatory risks. In rural towns, police would be trained as regulatory ambassadors. Just as a US Secretary of State can launch a "diplomatic surge" in Myanmar from 2009, so regulatory surges are possible in market sectors of high risk or high opportunity. We propose strategies of indirect reciprocity as a way in which reciprocity that is only episodic in these strategic ways can promote more general responsiveness. Indirect reciprocity is reciprocity that we do not personally experience, but learn from the experience of a culture. This means that so long as we sustain regulation as a relational as opposed to a purely technocratic process, indirect reciprocity might civilize regulatory compliance in an historical process informed by the theories of Elias and Putnam.
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.sourceRegulation & Governance
dc.titleThe iteration deficit in responsive regulation: Are regulatory ambassadors an answer?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolumeonline
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor160500 - POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4860843xPUB191
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBraithwaite, John, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHong, Seung-Hun, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage18
local.identifier.doi10.1111/rego.12049
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T07:54:56Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84892949769
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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