Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Transitions in Biological Organisation

Calcott, Brett

Description

The biological world is hierarchically organised – larger wholes are composed of smaller parts. One take on the different levels might look like this: genes, cells, organs, multicellular organisms, social groups of animals, species, and ecological communities. What processes formed this hierarchy? For the hierarchical structure has a history – many parts and wholes that we now take for granted simply did not exist before. In some cases parts aggregated to form a larger whole: once free-living...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCalcott, Brett
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-06T06:26:39Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-04T02:33:43Z
dc.date.available2010-12-06T06:26:39Z
dc.date.available2011-01-04T02:33:43Z
dc.identifier.otherb25317489
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/49391
dc.description.abstractThe biological world is hierarchically organised – larger wholes are composed of smaller parts. One take on the different levels might look like this: genes, cells, organs, multicellular organisms, social groups of animals, species, and ecological communities. What processes formed this hierarchy? For the hierarchical structure has a history – many parts and wholes that we now take for granted simply did not exist before. In some cases parts aggregated to form a larger whole: once free-living ants formed the first eusocial colonies. In other cases, the parts were formed within an already aggregated whole: kidneys, hearts, and the like came after multicellular creatures were formed. What can we say in general about these repeated transitions in biological organisation? Can we explain the production of each new level by appealing to the same, or similar, processes? The thesis addresses some of these questions, and how we might go about answering them.
dc.language.isoen
dc.rights.uriThe Australian National University
dc.titleTransitions in Biological Organisation
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
dcterms.valid2006
local.description.notesThis version of the thesis has slightly different pagination to the bound version but the text is the same.
local.description.refereedYes
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued2006
local.contributor.affiliationPhilosophy Program, Research School of Social Sciences
local.contributor.affiliationThe Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d7a2d7966e7b
local.mintdoimint
CollectionsOpen Access Theses

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
WholeThesis_Calcott.pdfWhole Thesis1.1 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  22 January 2019/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator