Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Government and the Community in Katherine, (1937-78)

Lea, John P

Description

This Study resulted from research examining the introduction of Local Government into the Northern Territory town of Jabiru, which was funded by the Northern Territory History Awards Committee and the Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies.¶ The research covers two time periods. Firstly the pre-war, wartime and immediate post-war period ( 1937-60) and the Katherine Town Management Board Era, (1960-78) These periods were interrupted by major changes in governance of both black and while...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLea, John P
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-09T03:39:35Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T08:41:11Z
dc.date.available2010-09-09T03:39:35Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T08:41:11Z
dc.identifier.isbn0731501055
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/49371
dc.description.abstractThis Study resulted from research examining the introduction of Local Government into the Northern Territory town of Jabiru, which was funded by the Northern Territory History Awards Committee and the Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies.¶ The research covers two time periods. Firstly the pre-war, wartime and immediate post-war period ( 1937-60) and the Katherine Town Management Board Era, (1960-78) These periods were interrupted by major changes in governance of both black and while Katherine residents.¶ Two complementary themes are pursued. First, the roles of town residents and higher government levels in achieving autonomy, through introduction of a progress association, the town management board and, finally, local government is considered. Secondly, attitudes towards Aboriginal issues are monitored, as they emerged historically. This theme is linked with changes to the district economy and Northern Territory administrative regulations, which may have influenced the choice of Katherine as a centre for Aboriginal settlement.¶ Many factors govern Small town politics and attitudes, including the influence of dominant personalities. This research attempts to highlight the role played in Katherine’s urban affairs by certain members of the Northern Territory Legislative Council and Assembly, officers of the former Northern Territory administration and prominent town residents.¶ The terms “part aboriginal” and “half-caste” are used in the study because of their historical importance and their former legal recognition. No offence is intended by these distinctions, and the importance of non-white residents’ contribution to Katherine’s development is acknowledged.¶
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBrinkin, NT : The Australian National University, North Australia Research Unit (NARU)
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMonograph (The Australian National University. North Australia Research Unit (NARU))
dc.subjectGovernment, Katherine, Katherine Progress Association, World War 2, Evacuation, Town Management, Local Government, Local Politics, Katherine Town Management Board, Elections, Eric Francis Dwyer, John Leslie Stuart Macfarlane
dc.titleGovernment and the Community in Katherine, (1937-78)
dc.typeBook
dc.date.issued1987
local.type.statusPublished Version
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU North Australia Research Unit (NARU)

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
GovernmentandtheCommunityinKatherine,1937-782.pdf2.93 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator