Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Is 'green' religion the solution to the ecological crisis? A case study of mainstream religion in Australia.

Douglas, Steven Murray

Description

A significant and growing number of authors and commentators have proposed that ecologically enlightened (‘greened’) religion is the solution or at least a major part of the solution to the global ecological crisis. These include Birch, 1965 p90; ... . Proponents offer a variety of reasons for this view, including that the majority of the world’s and many nations’ people identify themselves as religious, and that there is a large amount of land and infrastructure controlled by religious...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDouglas, Steven Murray
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-08T02:01:07Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-04T02:35:02Z
dc.date.available2010-06-08T02:01:07Z
dc.date.available2011-01-04T02:35:02Z
dc.identifier.otherb23544569
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/49314
dc.description.abstractA significant and growing number of authors and commentators have proposed that ecologically enlightened (‘greened’) religion is the solution or at least a major part of the solution to the global ecological crisis. These include Birch, 1965 p90; ... . Proponents offer a variety of reasons for this view, including that the majority of the world’s and many nations’ people identify themselves as religious, and that there is a large amount of land and infrastructure controlled by religious organisations worldwide. However, the most important reason is that ‘religion’ is said to have one or more exceptional qualities that can drive and sustain dramatic personal and societal change. The underlying or sometimes overt suggestion is that as the ecological crisis is ultimately a moral crisis, religion is best placed to address the problem at its root. ¶ ... ¶ This thesis tests the proposition that religion is the solution to the ecological crisis. It does this using a case study of mainstream religion in Australia, represented by the Catholic, Anglican, and Uniting Churches. The Churches’ ecological policies and practices are analysed to determine the extent to which these denominations are fulfilling, or might be able to fulfil, the proposition. The primary research method is an Internet-based search for policy and praxis material. The methodology is Critical Human Ecology. ¶ ...
dc.language.isoen
dc.rights.uriThe Australian National University
dc.subjectreligious environmentalism, political religion, Catholicism, Anglicanism, Uniting Church, Australian religion, ecological conversion, faith and ecology, faith and environmentalism, the 'greening' of religion, the 'greening' of the Church, climate change, human ecology religious aspects, faith-based environmentalism, Christianity, ecotheology, nature conservation, environmental protection, ecospirituality, ecological spirituality, transpersonal ecology, ecopsychology, ecophilosophy, environmental philosophy
dc.titleIs 'green' religion the solution to the ecological crisis? A case study of mainstream religion in Australia.
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
dcterms.valid2008
local.description.refereedyes
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued2008
local.contributor.affiliationFenner School of Environment and Society
local.contributor.affiliationThe Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d7a2c8b9eb22
local.mintdoimint
CollectionsOpen Access Theses

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
02whole.pdf1.53 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
01front.pdf186.98 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator