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Dynamics of laboratory models of the wind-driven ocean circulation

Kiss, Andrew Elek

Description

This thesis presents a numerical exploration of the dynamics governing rotating flow driven by a surface stress in the " sliced cylinder " model of Pedlosky & Greenspan (1967) and Beardsley (1969), and its close relative, the " sliced cone " model introduced by Griffiths & Veronis (1997). The sliced cylinder model simulates the barotropic wind-driven circulation in a circular basin with vertical sidewalls, using a depth gradient to mimic the effects of a gradient in Coriolis parameter. In the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorKiss, Andrew Elek
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-23T01:20:17Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-04T02:39:15Z
dc.date.available2008-09-23T01:20:17Z
dc.date.available2011-01-04T02:39:15Z
dc.date.created2000-12
dc.identifier.otherb20791033
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/47497
dc.identifier.urihttp://digitalcollections.anu.edu.au/handle/1885/47497
dc.description.abstractThis thesis presents a numerical exploration of the dynamics governing rotating flow driven by a surface stress in the " sliced cylinder " model of Pedlosky & Greenspan (1967) and Beardsley (1969), and its close relative, the " sliced cone " model introduced by Griffiths & Veronis (1997). The sliced cylinder model simulates the barotropic wind-driven circulation in a circular basin with vertical sidewalls, using a depth gradient to mimic the effects of a gradient in Coriolis parameter. In the sliced cone the vertical sidewalls are replaced by an azimuthally uniform slope around the perimeter of the basin to simulate a continental slope. Since these models can be implemented in the laboratory, their dynamics can be explored by a complementary interplay of analysis and numerical and laboratory experiments. ¶ In this thesis a derivation is presented of a generalised quasigeostrophic formulation which is valid for linear and moderately nonlinear barotropic flows over large-amplitude topography on an f-plane, yet retains the simplicity and conservation properties of the standard quasigeostrophic vorticity equation (which is valid only for small depth variations). This formulation is implemented in a numerical model based on a code developed by Page (1982) and Becker & Page (1990). ¶ ...
dc.language.isoen
dc.rights.uriThe Australian National University
dc.subjectWind driven ocean circulation
dc.subjectRotating flow
dc.subjectsurface stress
dc.subjectquasiquasigeostrophic formulation
dc.subjectsliced cylinder
dc.subjectsliced cone
dc.subjectphysical oceanography
dc.titleDynamics of laboratory models of the wind-driven ocean circulation
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
dcterms.valid2001
local.description.refereedyes
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued2000
local.contributor.affiliationResearch School of Earth Sciences
local.contributor.affiliationThe Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d7a29a4f374e
local.mintdoimint
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01Front.pdf66.79 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail
02Front-Chapters1-2.pdf311.56 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail
03Chapter3.pdf2.09 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
04Chapter4.pdf3.07 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
05Chapter5.pdf3.46 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
06Chapter6-End.pdf253.16 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail
07Whole.pdf9.17 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail


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