Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Lessons from biological processing of image texture

Maddess, Ted; Nagai, Yoshinori

Description

When designing artificial vision systems, it may be useful to examine the solutions 0.5 billion years of biological evolution have produced. Recent studies of human vision; studies of macaque visual cortical function; and behavioural studies of bee vision, all indicate that different species have evolved related approaches for discriminating image textures. This common strategy uses short-range 4th-order spatial correlations. Isotrigon textures, ensemble averages of which have 3rd-order...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMaddess, Ted
dc.contributor.authorNagai, Yoshinori
dc.contributor.editorNakagawa, H
dc.contributor.editorIshii, K
dc.contributor.editorMiyamoto, H
dc.date.accessioned2007-06-25T07:05:39Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T08:39:22Z
dc.date.available2007-06-25T07:05:39Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T08:39:22Z
dc.date.created2004
dc.identifier.citationInternational Congress Series 1269 (2004) pp. 26–29
dc.identifier.issn0531-5131
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/45288
dc.description.abstractWhen designing artificial vision systems, it may be useful to examine the solutions 0.5 billion years of biological evolution have produced. Recent studies of human vision; studies of macaque visual cortical function; and behavioural studies of bee vision, all indicate that different species have evolved related approaches for discriminating image textures. This common strategy uses short-range 4th-order spatial correlations. Isotrigon textures, ensemble averages of which have 3rd-order correlation functions that are equal to 0, are useful for studying this sense. Recent results from humans and bees, and methods for producing new isotrigon textures are described.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceInternational Congress Series
dc.subjecttexture discrimination
dc.subjectisotrigon
dc.subjecttexture recognition
dc.subjectisodipole
dc.subjectbee
dc.subjecthuman
dc.titleLessons from biological processing of image texture
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.refereedyes
local.identifier.citationvolume1269
local.rights.ispublishedyes
local.identifier.absfor170112 - Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub8611
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationThe Australian National University, Centre for Visual Sciences, Research School for Biological Sciences
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage26
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage29
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ics.2004.04.100
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:32:05Z
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
2004MaddessNagaiLessonsOnTextureProcessingBrainIT.pdf195.16 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator