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Capacity development in the international development context: implications for Indigenous Australia

Hunt, Janet

Description

Capacity development has become a key concept in international development in recent years. Older approaches involving technical cooperation, in which knowledge and skills were to be transferred to developing countries, have been unsuccessful. In contrast capacity development is viewed as an endogenous process within organisations and communities which are themselves embedded in wider systems. Understanding the features of these systems which might support rather than inhibit capacity...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHunt, Janet
dc.contributor.otherAustralian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research
dc.date.accessioned2005-11-11
dc.date.accessioned2006-03-27T02:08:40Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T08:32:28Z
dc.date.available2006-03-27T02:08:40Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T08:32:28Z
dc.date.created2005
dc.identifier.isbn0-7315-5653-4
dc.identifier.issn1036 1774
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/43047
dc.description.abstractCapacity development has become a key concept in international development in recent years. Older approaches involving technical cooperation, in which knowledge and skills were to be transferred to developing countries, have been unsuccessful. In contrast capacity development is viewed as an endogenous process within organisations and communities which are themselves embedded in wider systems. Understanding the features of these systems which might support rather than inhibit capacity development is therefore important. The paper first clarifies aspects of the term ‘capacity development’ and then draws on recent research and experience of capacity development to draw out some of the key international lessons, especially in relation to the ‘enabling environment’. It then outlines a number of community and organisational approaches to capacity development, but cautions that cross-cultural issues may affect capacity development at different levels. The paper concludes by raising questions about the implications of this international development experience for thinking about capacity development in Indigenous Australia. It particularly argues for a greater focus on removing the constraints in the enabling environment in order to better foster Indigenous capacity.
dc.format.extent2537398 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCanberra, ACT : Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR), The Australian National University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion Paper (Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR), The Australian National University); No. 278
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.subjectcapacity development
dc.subjectinternational development
dc.subjectenabling environment
dc.subjectcross-cultural issues
dc.subjectIndigenous Australia
dc.titleCapacity development in the international development context: implications for Indigenous Australia
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
local.description.refereedno
local.identifier.citationyear2005
local.identifier.eprintid3302
local.rights.ispublishedno
local.identifier.absfor169902 - Studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Society
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationANU
local.contributor.affiliationCAEPR
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancePermission to deposit in Open Research received from CAEPR (ERMS2230079)
CollectionsANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR)

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