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Submission to the Senate Community Affairs References Committee in the matter of the Inquiry into the Gene Technology Bill 2000

Anton, Donald

Description

In July 1999, Deutsche Bank, a leading international investment firm, issued a report highlighting that genetically modified products are fast becoming an economic liability. By the end of 1999, more than 30 farm groups in the United States, including the American Corn Growers Association, were advising farmers not to grow genetically engineered crops. These developments call into serious question the wisdom of the "Ministerial Introduction" contained in the recently released Australian...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorAnton, Donald
dc.date.accessioned2003-05-29
dc.date.accessioned2004-05-19T16:30:44Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T08:49:50Z
dc.date.available2004-05-19T16:30:44Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T08:49:50Z
dc.date.created2000
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/41602
dc.description.abstractIn July 1999, Deutsche Bank, a leading international investment firm, issued a report highlighting that genetically modified products are fast becoming an economic liability. By the end of 1999, more than 30 farm groups in the United States, including the American Corn Growers Association, were advising farmers not to grow genetically engineered crops. These developments call into serious question the wisdom of the "Ministerial Introduction" contained in the recently released Australian Biotechnology: A National Strategy. Indeed instead of delivering improved international "competitiveness and sustainability" for Australia, the policy decision to promote genetic modification, including of agricultural and food products, in Australia may have a profound opposite effect. More importantly for the present Inquiry, however, the concerns of Deutsche Bank and the US farm groups emphasise the growing uncertainty about the risks to human health and safety and to the environment that are attendant on genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In order to address these risks in Australia, the Gene Technology Bill 2000 ('the GTB 2000') was introduced into Parliament on 22 June of this year. Unfortunately, as this submission demonstrates, in its current form the GTB 2000 is unlikely to provide effective protection against potential risks posed by GMOs and GM products for at least six paramount reasons.
dc.format.extent152069 bytes
dc.format.extent360 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.subjectGene Technology Bill
dc.subjectgenetically engineered crops
dc.subjectgenetically modified organisms
dc.subjectGMOs
dc.titleSubmission to the Senate Community Affairs References Committee in the matter of the Inquiry into the Gene Technology Bill 2000
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
local.description.refereedno
local.identifier.citationyear2000
local.identifier.eprintid1358
local.rights.ispublishedno
dc.date.issued2000
local.type.statusPublished version
local.contributor.affiliationANU
local.contributor.affiliationACEL, Faculty of Law
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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