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Indigenous Australians and the rules of the social security system: universalism, apppropriateness, and justice

Sanders, Will

Description

Noel Pearson has recently argued that inclusion in a 'passive' welfare system, over the last thirty years, has been to the detriment of Aboriginal society. This paper approaches the inclusion of Aboriginal people in the social security system from a slightly different perspective, while taking seriously Pearson's concerns. It argues that, despite norms and aspirations of universalism, rules within the social security system are social constructs derived from and intended for the particular...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSanders, Will
dc.date.accessioned2003-03-25
dc.date.accessioned2004-05-19T16:22:10Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T08:50:01Z
dc.date.available2004-05-19T16:22:10Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T08:50:01Z
dc.date.created2001
dc.identifier.issn1036 1774
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/41590
dc.description.abstractNoel Pearson has recently argued that inclusion in a 'passive' welfare system, over the last thirty years, has been to the detriment of Aboriginal society. This paper approaches the inclusion of Aboriginal people in the social security system from a slightly different perspective, while taking seriously Pearson's concerns. It argues that, despite norms and aspirations of universalism, rules within the social security system are social constructs derived from and intended for the particular social and economic circumstances of the dominant society. When those rules are applied to the very different social and economic circumstances of minority groups, such as Indigenous Australians, major issues of adaptation and interpretation arise. This paper draws on research experience spanning 20 years on relations between Indigenous Australians and the social security system to illustrate the degree to which adaptation has occurred, in the pursuit of realism. However it also argues current relations between the social security system and Indigenous Australians are not just and fair because the rules of the system do not equally reflect Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples' social and economic circumstances.
dc.format.extent106709 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCentre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR), The Australian National University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion Paper (Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR), The Australian National University): No. 212
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.subjectIndigenous Australians
dc.subjectsocial security systems
dc.subjectsocioeconomic conditions
dc.titleIndigenous Australians and the rules of the social security system: universalism, apppropriateness, and justice
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
local.description.refereedno
local.identifier.citationyear2001
local.identifier.citationyear2001
local.identifier.eprintid1023
local.rights.ispublishedyes
local.identifier.absfor169902 - Studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Society
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationANU
local.contributor.affiliationCAEPR
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancePermission to deposit in Open Research received from CAEPR (ERMS2230079)
CollectionsANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR)

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